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Reading in the news - Mon 16 Sep – University of Reading

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Reading in the news - Mon 16 Sep

Release Date 16 September 2019

Reading in the news

 

Neighbourhood planning: The Independent and Yahoo News republish an article written for The Conversation by Professor Gavin Parker (REP).

Urban hedgehogs: The Sunday Telegraph references Reading research on what makes a hedgehog-friendly garden in an article on an apparent rise in the number of hedgehogs in towns and cities.

Illustration exhibition: The Financial Times includes the Marie Neurath exhibition at House of Illustration in London, featuring items from the collections at the University of Reading, in a round up of things to see in the capital.

Open banking: Professor Brian Scott Quinn (Henley Business School) spoke to US radio stations, including Michigan Radio, about European banking rules being introduced in the US.

LGBT human rights: LBC radio interviewed Professor Rosa Freedman (School of Law) on how human rights laws could be adapted to support transgender members of the community.

Other coverage

 

  • Farmers Weekly reports on a Reading study that found adding oils extracted from the oregano plant can reduce antimicrobial-resistant bacteria in milk when fed to calves.
  • BBC Radio Berkshire spoke to the new Muslim chaplain Javid Kachhalia. Read our news story.
  • Relief Web reports on PICSA, a project developed at Reading to allow farmers in Rwanda to use agriculture and climate information to make decisions.
  • People Management reports on a Henley Business School survey of workers and business leaders that showed how much an organisations’ social values influenced its recruitment decision.
  • PhD student Akshay Deoras (Meteorology) is quoted by Hindustan Times on the record amount of rainfall in Mumbai during the monsoon.
  • Henley Standard mentions PhD student in article on Brexit.
  • The history of Foxhill House on Reading’s Whiteknights campus is mentioned in a Get Reading article debunking urban myths in the town.

 

 

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