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Reading in the News - Weds 30 Oct – University of Reading

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Reading in the News - Weds 30 Oct

Release Date 30 October 2019

Reading in the news

Grave matters: Professor Duncan Garrow (Archaeology)’s project with the British Museum to examine items buried with the dead is the focus of an article by The Guardian. Poet Michael Rosen will read a series of poems relating to ‘grave goods’ at the museum on Hallowe’en (Thursday).

It’s not what you say, it’s the way you say it: Professor Jane Setter (English Language and Applied Linguistics) spoke to Talk Radio (from 17:30) about her new book Your Voice Speaks Volumes. Read our story here.

Environment Bill: Professor Chris Hilson (Law) has added his name to the signatories of an open letter, published by The Telegraph, on the controversial Environment Bill.

All I want for Christmas is a General Election: Dr Mark Shanahan (Politics & IR) is quoted by Al-Jazeera in an article about the upcoming general election on December 12.

Iraq unrest: Dr Dina Rezk (History) spoke to Al-Jazeera about the ongoing unrest in Iraq.

 

Other coverage

  • Dr Paola Tosi’s research into the effects of a gluten-free diet on gut health is covered by Knowridge.com and Food Navigator.
  • Professor Lisa Methven (Food and Bioprocessing Sciences) is quoted is quoted in an article by Food Manufacture on the news that the University of Reading has been awarded  a £170m grant to lead a consortium of research institutions in a doctoral training programme to train the next generation of food microbiologists.
  • Pragativadi covers a study co-authored by Dr Daniel Lamport (Psychology & Clinical Languages) on the effects of drinking orange juice in later life to improve cognitive health.
  • Risk Africa mentions the Henley Business School’s study of ‘side hustles’ in an article about multiple jobs.
  • A study on sugar carried out by the University is mentioned in an article by Men’s Health (Spanish).

 

 

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