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Britain’s first female MP, preventing heart attacks and our Tate Modern takeover – Reading in the news Tues 23 Jan – University of Reading

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Britain’s first female MP, preventing heart attacks and our Tate Modern takeover – Reading in the news Tues 23 Jan

Release Date 23 January 2018

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Women's suffragette movement: Dr Jacqui Turner (History) spoke to BBC Radio Berkshire (approx. 1 hour 15 mins in) about the women's suffragette movement and the story behind Lady Astor - Britain's first female MP to take up her seat in Parliament.

Preventing heart attacks: Scientists at the University have received funding from the British Heart Foundation to investigate how blood clots form - in an effort to help improve the prevention of heart attacks. BBC Radio Berkshire featured the news in yesterday's news bulletins and Public Now has picked up the story too. Read our news story.

Research funding success: Researchers at the University of Reading won a record amount of research funding from the UK Research Councils in 2016/17. ITV Meridian covered the story. Read our news story.

Tate Modern takeover: Art students and staff, along with local schools, are part of a takeover project at the Tate Modern in London this week. BBC Radio Berkshire featured a short piece on it in today's news bulletin and GetReading covered it also. Read our news story.

Bad management: An article in HR Magazine on the subject of bad management features comment from Dr Charmi Patel (Henley Business School) saying that employers must support managers within their business to improve their people skills.

 

Other coverage:

  • BBC Radio Berkshire (1 hour 20 mins in) interviewed Professor Robert Van de Noort (Pro-Vice Chancellor) about plans for the redevelopment of St Patrick's Hall, including the University's response to complaints by some local residents. The story featured as an item in news bulletins throughout the day.
  • Dr Filippo Menga (Geography) features in Danish publication Globalnyt for an article on the topic of the controversial Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD) and how this is effecting relations between Ethiopia and Egypt.
  • The University is hosting a memorial concert for student Ben Pedley, who died in a tragic cycling accident last March. GetReading features a story on the concert and how people can buy tickets.
  • Henley Business School's Ardi Kolah is listed among a number of speakers at the second annual data protection conference Dublin Data Sec 2018 - taking place in April. Irish Tech News profiles the upcoming event. Henley Business School has also announced a partnership with GDPR Summit Series, according to Digital Marketing Magazine.
  • PhD student Nadia Al-Sakkaf speaks to Kaplan Herald about the role of women in the Yemen conflict.
  • Professor Brian Scott-Quinn (ICMA) endorses The New Financial Instruments: 2nd Edition: Frontiers in Finance Series, featured on Sat PR.
  • An article on Virgin.com focusing on making a positive change in your career includes advice from Dr Christian van Nieuwerburgh (Henley Business School).
  • Farmers Guardian has an article on farmers in the South West investigating the potential for commercial production of combinable organic protein crops, lupins and soya. It references their work with Dr Hannah Jones (SAPD).
  • The Henley Standard features a personal profile of Pam Myles-Hooton (Director of Clinical Studies at the Charlie Waller Institute), following the tragic death of her husband.
  • OptiBiotix is developing sweeteners than are calorie-free. A study carried out by The Flavour and Sensory Science Centre at the University of Reading showed that the company's sweeteners scored well against competitors. Proactive Investors and Directors Talk Interviews feature stories.
  • Reading graduate Tom Goode has joined global property consultancy Knight Frank and will be based out of their Leeds office. Business Link Magazine reports.

 

 

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