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Why all animals have equal chance of survival - Reading in the news Tue 9 Jan – University of Reading

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Why all animals have equal chance of survival - Reading in the news Tue 9 Jan

Release Date 09 January 2018

All Earth's animals have the same chance of survival, says the new study

Here is today's media report.

 

Survival of the fittest?: Professor Richard Sibly (Biological Sciences) is quoted as a co-author of a new study published in Nature Ecology and Evolution that suggests all animals have an equal chance of survival on Earth. Regardless of size, location and life history, they argue all plants and animals are equally ‘fit’ for survival. The study is reported by Science News Online and Science Daily. Read our news story here.

Superfood science: A repeat of TV show ‘The Truth About Healthy Eating’ on London Live featured a head to head experiment on ‘superfoods’ by Dr Gunter Kuhnle (Food and Nutritional Sciences) to see which ones, if any, are genuinely better for us than ‘regular’ foods.

Cabinet reshuffle: BBC Radio Berkshire (1 hr 21 mins 10 secs) interviewed Dr Mark Shanahan (Politics & IR) on Theresa May’s Cabinet reshuffle, and who he felt was likely to be promoted.

Other coverage

 

  • BBC Radio Berkshire (48 mins 30 secs) interviewed postdoctoral research associate Jo Mitchell (Biological Sciences) about an appeal for volunteers to donate blood to a new heart disease study at the University of Reading. The story also featured in the station’s news bulletins on Monday. Read our news story.
  • An Economia feature on attracting top talent into accountancy and finance mentions that Strategic Studies courses are offered at Henley Business School.
  • A tweet by Dr Mark Shanahan (Politics & IR) in response to an Irish Times appeal for suggestions of nightmare jobs is used in the resulting article.
  • Get Reading reports on Reading’s alumni team’s performance in the final of Christmas University Challenge.

 

 

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