BI1EAB1-Animal Diversity

Module Provider: School of Biological Sciences
Number of credits: 10 [5 ECTS credits]
Level:4
Terms in which taught: Autumn term module
Pre-requisites:
Non-modular pre-requisites: Please note there are limited places available on this module
Co-requisites:
Modules excluded:
Current from: 2020/1

Module Convenor: Dr Amanda Callaghan

Email: a.callaghan@reading.ac.uk

Type of module:

Summary module description:

The course will help students develop zoology-specific skills such as use of recognizing features that classify animals into phyla. The course takes students through the diversity of animal life, from simple sponges through to the vertebrates. It is further supported in the Spring Term by a module on mammals. It provides a taxonomic foundation on which to lay future studies of invertebrate and vertebrate zoology in part 2 and will help students to appreciate the diversity of animals they will see on their field courses at the end of part 1.


Aims:

Through lectures and practical sessions and using real animal specimens from the Cole Museum of Zoology, this course will provide an introduction to the metazoa (multi-cellular animals). It provides a taxonomic foundation on which to lay future studies of invertebrate and vertebrate zoology in part 2 and will help students to appreciate the diversity of animals they will see on their field courses at the end of part 1. Students will develop basic zoological knowledge relating to classification of animal groups, including body plans, growth patterns and feeding and will go on to develop an overview of the animal tree of life. Students will start to build their zoological glossary which will be invaluable later on in the degree. The course will expose students to many animal groups that they will not have heard of, many of which are marine invertebrates. 


Assessable learning outcomes:

Intended learning outcomes:



By the end of the course, students will be expected to be able to:



1. understand the correct method to classify organisms and write species names.

2. describe the different geological eras post-life.

3. be able to identify the "big nine" animal phyla.

4. have an overview of animal diversity.

5. have developed an overview of the metazoan tree of life.
6. develop a basic understanding of animal body plans. 

7. Understand the broader concepts of biodiversity

8. Know how to use microscopes

9. Have learned observational techniques and drawing skills



Assessable learning outcomes:



1. Ability to classify organisms and write species names.

2. Ability to describe the different geological eras post-life.

3. Ident ification and naming of the "big nine" animal phyla.

4. Overview of the metazoan tree of life including why animals are placed in each grouping and phylum names.

5. Understanding of body plans and functional anatomy.

6. Understanding of variety of life-cycles among animal groups.

7. Demonstrating principles of evolutionary adaptation.

8. Understanding of importance of evolutionary facts that have driven diversity.


Additional outcomes:


  • Students will develop their time management skills.

  • Students will be exposed to unknown animal groups enabling them to expand their zoological knowledge.

  • Students may appreciate the importance of traditionally non-charismatic animals.


Outline content:

Lectures will be used to cover the evolution of animal life on earth with mention of all the major animal phyla and some details of animals in the Chordata. These will tie in directly to modules in part 2 or 3. The idea is to give you a taste of the upcoming modules and hopefully to be able to put modules into the context of the wider subject. Lectures will be supported by the use of formative laboratory practicals, designed to support deeper learning. These will expose students to specimens of animals mentioned in the lectures and to see first-hand the features that are used to classify them. N.B. The module does not cover animal ecology and/or conservation.


Global context:

Animals live word wide in almost every habitat on the planet. The study of zoology is by its very nature global. 


Brief description of teaching and learning methods:

Lectures; practical sessions and test questions.  This module will be taught in association with the Cole Museum of Zoology and the zoology teaching collections.


Contact hours:
  Autumn Spring Summer
Lectures 20
Practicals classes and workshops 20
Guided independent study: 60
       
Total hours by term 0 0
       
Total hours for module 100

Summative Assessment Methods:
Method Percentage
Written exam 60
Report 40

Summative assessment- Examinations:

Section A: MCQ (30 questions, answer all)



Section B: Short written answers, three out of choice of six.



Sections A and B count equally towards the exam mark.



2 hours


Summative assessment- Coursework and in-class tests:

A written report will be summatively assessed, worth 40% of the marks. Submission date is week 15.


Formative assessment methods:

Practical sessions enabling the student to supplement their learning. A written report will be formatively assessed to feed forward to the summative assessment in week 15 – hand in date week 11.


Penalties for late submission:

The Module Convenor will apply the following penalties for work submitted late:

  • where the piece of work is submitted after the original deadline (or any formally agreed extension to the deadline): 10% of the total marks available for that piece of work will be deducted from the mark for each working day[1] (or part thereof) following the deadline up to a total of five working days;
  • where the piece of work is submitted more than five working days after the original deadline (or any formally agreed extension to the deadline): a mark of zero will be recorded.
The University policy statement on penalties for late submission can be found at: http://www.reading.ac.uk/web/FILES/qualitysupport/penaltiesforlatesubmission.pdf
You are strongly advised to ensure that coursework is submitted by the relevant deadline. You should note that it is advisable to submit work in an unfinished state rather than to fail to submit any work.

Assessment requirements for a pass:

A mark of 40% overall


Reassessment arrangements:
By examination in August/September

Additional Costs (specified where applicable):

Specialist clothing, footwear or headgear: In compliance with the Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) 1992 Act, while studying this module students will be expected to wear the following item/s: Lab coat/Safety glasses/Safety gloves. The Department/School can provide students with safety gloves for free but students should purchase a lab coat at a cost of £12 and safety glasses at a cost of £3. These can be used for multiple modules over the course of your degree. Students who choose not to purchase from the University must ensure that their PPE meets the latest British/European Safety Standards.

 


Last updated: 4 April 2020

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS MODULE DESCRIPTION DOES NOT FORM ANY PART OF A STUDENT'S CONTRACT.

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