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Dr Stephen Thomson – University of Reading

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Dr Stephen Thomson

Name:
Dr Stephen Thomson
Job Title:
Lecturer
Photograph of Dr Stephen Thomson

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I convene the module 'Family Romances: Genealogy, Identity, and Imposture in the Nineteenth-century Novel'. My teaching profile can be found at Stephen Thomson Teaching, Convening and Supervision

My broad research focus is on ways in which ideas and anxieties of modernity are played out in literary narratives of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, with a particular focus on ideas of sleepwalking.  For more details of my research, please see Stephen Thomson Research

Recent Publications include:

Forthcoming: 'Jeu d'ecarts: Derrida's Descartes', Oxford Literary Review 39:2 (December 2017)

'Ancillary Narratives: Maids, Sleepwalking, and Agency in Nineteenth-centry Literature and Culture, Textual Practice 29:1 (2015), pp. 91-110Textual Practice 29:1 (2015), pp. 91-110

'Sleepwalking Certainties: Agency, Aesthetics, and Incapacity in W.G. Sebald's Austerlitz and Hermann Broch's The Sleepwalkers', Comparative Literature 65:2 (Spring 2013)

'"A tangle of tatters': ghosts and the busy nothing in Footfalls', in Beckett and nothing: Trying to understand Beckett ed. by Daniela Caselli (MUP, 2010), pp.65-83

For a full list of publications please see Stephen Thomson Publications

I would welcome enquiries from potential doctoral students in any area of nineteenth-or twentieth-century literature, particularly relating to ideas and problems of modernity, politics, and agency; and dealing with literary theory, especially Derrida.  I would also be interested in projects with a  comparative element, particularly relating to twentieth-century European literature.

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