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#ShowYourStripes: Greta Thunberg among thousands to share Reading scientist’s climate change graphics – University of Reading

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#ShowYourStripes: Greta Thunberg among thousands to share Reading scientist’s climate change graphics

Release Date 22 June 2021

#ShowYourStripes 2021

Climate stripes graphics created at the University of Reading, showing how temperatures have risen in all corners of the globe, have again been shared by thousands of people around the world.

Updated and brand new warming stripes produced by Professor Ed Hawkins were made publicly available to download ahead of Monday 21 June at showyourstripes.info.

The site was visited 60,000 times on that day alone, as television weather presenters, scientists and the public shared the stripes on the summer/winter solstice, using the hashtag #ShowYourStripes.

Among those to show their stripes on social media were environmental activist Greta Thunberg, high-profile organisations like the UN, World Meteorological Organization and Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, and many television weather presenters on the BBC, ITV and other channels worldwide.

Find out more about the warming stripes >>>

“Everyone who downloads and shares the stripes is contributing to highlighting the impact climate change is having on the planet" - Professor Ed Hawkins, warming stripes creator, University of Reading

Professor Hawkins, climate scientist at the University of Reading, said: “Once more, I am blown away by the level of support for the warming stripes and the sheer number of people who have engaged with them this year.

“Everyone who downloads and shares the stripes is contributing to highlighting the impact climate change is having on the planet. Collaboration and partnerships will be key to adapting to climate change and preventing things from getting any worse, so thousands of people coming together to show their stripes is an encouraging sight.”

Spot the stripes

Other ways the warming stripes were shared in 2021 included:

  • Leighton Park School in Reading using a large stripes banner to mark its Sustainability Week.
  • Turned into music by environmental initiative Scientists for Future.
  • Canberra Baptist Church in Australia being wrapped in a giant climate stripes scarf that was knitted by churchgoers.
  • A vestment created by the Environmental Advisor to the Bishop of Newcastle.
  • The UN House Select Committee on the Climate Crisis updating its logo with the updated stripes.
  • Transformed into jumpers, blankets and ties.
  • Printed on face coverings.

Since their creation in 2018, the stripes have been spotted at COP25, on badges worn by US senators, on the Main Stage at Reading Festival, on homemade dresses, at climate protests, and on the side of a Tesla.

This was the fourth year in a row the stripes have been shared en masse on the summer/winter solstice.

Partnering for the Planet

The University of Reading has also today announced more climate action activities ahead of the COP26 international climate change conference, due to be held in Glasgow in November 2021.

A virtual Climate Education Summit will be held on 15 September, bringing together teachers, pupils, scientists, policymakers, campaigners and the public to discuss how to improve climate change education in schools.

A partnership with fashion label Tammam will see sustainably-made dresses and other stripes clothing launched during London Fashion Week in September.

These activities are part of the University’s Partnering for the Planet campaign, highlighting its world-leading climate research and significant action to reduce its institutional carbon footprint.

Find out more at reading.ac.uk/planet

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