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Reading in the news - 6 March – University of Reading

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Reading in the news - 6 March

Release Date 06 March 2019

Adder

 

Snakes in peril: The Telegraph, The Times, and the Daily Express picked up on research carried out by Dr Emma Gardner (Ecology and Evolutionary Biology) into adder populations, which suggests that the UK’s only venomous snake could disappear within two decades.

The heart DOES go on: Medical Xpress and the Francis Crick Institute picked up on a report by Dr Sandrine Claus (Food & Nutritional Sciences) which found that cells in parts of the body including the heart, kidney and liver continue to see activity at a molecular level in the 24 hours following death.

Pancake Race: GetReading reported that the University’s Law School team raised the most money in the annual Pancake Day Race, which was held in Reading town centre on Tuesday. The Law School team raised more than £1,000 in just five days for homelessness charity Launchpad.

Cheesy science: The University’s food department appeared on BBC 2 documentary Inside The Factory discussing the science behind the perfect pizza toppings. No members of the University community were featured I the segment.

 

Other Coverage

 

  • wunderground.com mentions a study carried out by Professor Mathew Owens (Meteorology) on the connections between the Maunder minimum and the Little Ice Age, within a wider article on quiet solar activity.
  • Researchers from the University are mentioned alongside colleagues from University of Exeter in an article on extratropical cyclones in Physics World.
  • French website ActuaLitte.com picked up the story of Merlin the Bat, documenting the series of tweets posted by the Museum of English Rural Life.
  • Russian website remedium.ru mentions a study carried out by the University which shows the rates of obesity have tripled since the 1980s, in an article on the number of bariatric operations carried out in Russia last year.
  • Environmental Management graduate Jack Buckingham has been named as the very first recipient of the Brian Chambers Award for excelling in the FACTS plant nutrition examination, as reported by Agronomist and Arable Farmer.

 

 

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