PLMLDGR-Language and Communication in Genetic Disorders

Module Provider: Clinical Language Sciences
Number of credits: 20 [10 ECTS credits]
Level:7
Terms in which taught: Spring term module
Pre-requisites:
Non-modular pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Modules excluded:
Current from: 2019/0

Module Convenor: Dr Vesna Stojanovik

Email: V.Stojanovik@reading.ac.uk

Type of module:

Summary module description:

The module introduces the students to current research into language development and impairment in populations affected by genetic disorders (i.e. those with Williams syndrome and those with Down syndrome). The module covers several aspects of language development in both populations including early stages of language development, phonological and lexical development, grammatical development, pragmatics, and current intervention findings.


Aims:

The module aims: 1) to familiarise the students with current theoretical and clinical research on language development and impairment in populations affected by genetic disorders, and in particular those affected by Williams and Down’s syndrome; 2) to provide a wider theoretical context within which research on language in genetic disorders is particularly relevant.


Assessable learning outcomes:


  • In-depth knowledge of the language and communication characteristics of populations with Williams and Down’s syndrome

  • Clear understanding of and critical evaluation of theoretical argument that individuals with Williams and Down syndrome provide evidence for innate modularity

  • Ability to articulate clearly views on current theoretical debates in the field of language in genetic disorders

  • Ability to critically evaluate current intervention studies

  • Present ideas using appropriate academic style



Intended learning outcomes:



By the end of the modules, the students will be able to:




  • Show in-depth knowledge of the language characteristics of populations with Williams and Down’s syndrome

  • Show clear understanding of, and critically evaluate the argument that individuals with Williams and Down syndrome provide evidence for innate modularity

  • Clearly articulate their views on current theoretical debates in the field of language in genetic disorders

  • Present their ideas logically and effectively


Additional outcomes:


  • Working as part of a group

  • Critical thinking

  • Presentation skills


Outline content:

Global context:

The module will provide the students with in depth knowledge and understanding of how speech, language and communication develops in children affected by two different genetic disorders (Williams syndrome and Down Syndrome), areas of linguistic and cognitive strengths and weaknesses in the two populations and current theoretical explanations of the language and cognitive profiles.


Brief description of teaching and learning methods:

There will be 5 hours of lectures and 15 hours of student-led seminars. During the seminars a specific research paper will be discussed in depth and students will be expected to have read the paper and to contribute to the discussion.


Contact hours:
  Autumn Spring Summer
Lectures 5
Practicals classes and workshops 15
Guided independent study: 180
       
Total hours by term 200
       
Total hours for module

Summative Assessment Methods:
Method Percentage
Written exam 50
Written assignment including essay 50

Summative assessment- Examinations:

Summative assessment- Coursework and in-class tests:

Formative assessment methods:

presentations in class


Penalties for late submission:
Penalties for late submission on this module are in accordance with the University policy. Please refer to page 5 of the Postgraduate Guide to Assessment for further information: http://www.reading.ac.uk/internal/exams/student/exa-guidePG.aspx

Assessment requirements for a pass:

50%


Reassessment arrangements:

Additional Costs (specified where applicable):

Last updated: 10 April 2019

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS MODULE DESCRIPTION DOES NOT FORM ANY PART OF A STUDENT'S CONTRACT.

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