GM2GR-German Romanticism: The Search for Something More

Module Provider: Modern Languages
Number of credits: 20 [10 ECTS credits]
Level:5
Terms in which taught: Autumn / Spring / Summer module
Pre-requisites: GM1L3 Advanced German Language I or GM1L1 Beginners German Language or GM1L2 Intermediate German Language
Non-modular pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Modules excluded:
Current from: 2019/0

Module Convenor: Dr Ellen Pilsworth

Email: e.m.pilsworth@reading.ac.uk

Type of module:

Summary module description:

Perhaps no movement has had a greater impact on the foundations of modern western society than the Romantic movement. In this course, we will explore what romanticism is, and how it developed in response to ‘modernity’ around 1800. Through a series of discursive seminars, we will consider the romantics’ obsession with the past, with nature, and with love as ways to escape and to go beyond the routine experiences of ‘modern’ life. Set texts for study include poetry, prose extracts, novellas and short stories, that will either be provided or are available in low-cost Reclam editions.


Aims:

Perhaps no movement has had a greater impact on the foundations of modern western society than the Romantic movement. In this course, we will explore what romanticism is, and how it developed in response to ‘modernity’ around 1800. Through a series of discursive seminars, we will consider the romantics’ obsession with the past, with nature, and with love as ways to escape and to go beyond the routine experiences of ‘modern’ life. Set texts for study include poetry, prose extracts, novellas and short stories, that will either be provided or are available in low-cost Reclam editions.


Assessable learning outcomes:

Students will demonstrate an ability to analyse certain genres of literary text. They will gain practice in discussing what characterises a specific literary period, its themes and its style. Students will also be able to develop their research and writing skills.


Additional outcomes:

This module will also encourage the development of close reading and oral communication skills and students will learn to contribute effectively and persuasively to class discussions through seminar presentations and group work.


Outline content:

Perhaps no movement has had a greater impact on the foundations of modern western society than the Romantic movement. In their search for something more than the offerings of ‘modern’ life and technology, German romantic writers and thinkers around 1800 looked for ways to transcend the dull routines and threatening oppressiveness of everyday life. They did this by turning to nature and the wild, to the mysteries of religion and spirituality, by looking to the past as a ‘golden age’ of freedom and safety, and also by looking for love and connection with others. None of these ideas have become old fashioned, and they still have immense power to motivate us in different ways, both in private and political life. As well as exploring these romantic texts in their context ca. 1800, we will also consider the legacy of the Romantic movement in today’s society.


Brief description of teaching and learning methods:

A mixture of informal lectures and student-led seminars/discussions taking place in the Autumn and Spring terms. Students will acquire important background information from the lectures and will be encouraged to undertake independent work and prepare seminar presentations.


Contact hours:
  Autumn Spring Summer
Lectures 15 15
Guided independent study: 170
       
Total hours by term 185 15
       
Total hours for module 200

Summative Assessment Methods:
Method Percentage
Written assignment including essay 50
Project output other than dissertation 50

Summative assessment- Examinations:

Summative assessment- Coursework and in-class tests:

Students will submit ONE essay of approximately 2000-2500 words (50%). The second assignment (50%) will be EITHER another essay of 2000-2500 words, or a creative project to be agreed on with the module convenor.




  • Essay 1 (50%), submitted in first week of Spring term

  • Essay 2 OR creative project (50%), submitted in first week of Summer term



One piece of assessment worth no more than 50% of the module mark can be replaced by a report produced after an academic placement. The placement must be agreed in advance by the module convenor; the length of the report is to be equivalent to standard departmental practice for coursework. 


Formative assessment methods:

Students may be asked to prepare individual presentations as part of class discussion. These will not be formally assessed, but feedback will be provided by the lecturer and the other students.


Penalties for late submission:
The Module Convener will apply the following penalties for work submitted late:

  • where the piece of work is submitted after the original deadline (or any formally agreed extension to the deadline): 10% of the total marks available for that piece of work will be deducted from the mark for each working day[1] (or part thereof) following the deadline up to a total of five working days;
  • where the piece of work is submitted more than five working days after the original deadline (or any formally agreed extension to the deadline): a mark of zero will be recorded.

  • The University policy statement on penalties for late submission can be found at: http://www.reading.ac.uk/web/FILES/qualitysupport/penaltiesforlatesubmission.pdf
    You are strongly advised to ensure that coursework is submitted by the relevant deadline. You should note that it is advisable to submit work in an unfinished state rather than to fail to submit any work.

    Assessment requirements for a pass:

    40%


    Reassessment arrangements:

    Resubmission of coursework (in the event of failure in this module and in Part 2 as a whole) by 1.00 pm on the third Friday of August or, if the University is closed, the first working day thereafter.


    Additional Costs (specified where applicable):

    Required text books: £10

    Printing and binding: £10


    Last updated: 22 July 2019

    THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS MODULE DESCRIPTION DOES NOT FORM ANY PART OF A STUDENT'S CONTRACT.

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