BI2NCP5-Nature Conservation in Practice

Module Provider: School of Biological Sciences
Number of credits: 10 [5 ECTS credits]
Level:5
Terms in which taught: Spring term module
Pre-requisites:
Non-modular pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Modules excluded: AP2A59 Nature Conservation
Current from: 2019/0

Module Convenor: Dr Campbell Murn

Email: c.p.murn@reading.ac.uk

Type of module:

Summary module description:

This module aims to introduce students to the realities of nature conservation in practice. Using examples from the field, the module aims to provide students with an understanding of the inherent conflicts and challenges associated with nature conservation. We aim to develop effective tools and methods and encourage students to accept and address these challenges. By emphasising an evidence-based decision-making framework, students will gain an understanding of how data-driven conclusions can generate conservation priorities at the same time as understanding the realities faced by conservation practitioners in complex modern settings.


Aims:

This module aims to introduce students to the realities of nature conservation in practice. Using examples from the field, the module aims to provide students with an understanding of the inherent conflicts and challenges associated with nature conservation. We aim to develop effective tools and methods and encourage students to accept and address these challenges. By emphasising an evidence-based decision-making framework, students will gain an understanding of how data-driven conclusions can generate conservation priorities at the same time as understanding the realities faced by conservation practitioners in complex modern settings.


Assessable learning outcomes:

By the end of the unit it is expected that students will be able to: 




  • Realise and be able to demonstrate the difference between potential and actual solutions to conservation challenges

  • Apply a decision-making framework to the challenge of solving problems in conservation settings

  • Critically assess the value of predictions and the limitations of data collected during conservation activities

  • Demonstrate an understanding of how stakeholder engagement affects conservation planning, processes and outcomes


Additional outcomes:

Students will have the opportunity to develop and be assessed on their critical assessment, writing, presentation and discussion skills.


Outline content:

Lectures will cover a wide cross-section of topics and challenges in conservation. Specific methods and techniques include evidence-based conservation, ecological restoration and effective stakeholder engagement. Emphasis is on developing an understanding of (a) decision-making frameworks and (b) opposing viewpoints of different stakeholder groups and the consequences of this for conservation interventions.



The Practical sessions will consist of short presentations by students working in groups, and these will provide the basis for class discussion, assessment and feedback. Other practical classes will focus on methods such as Red Listing and developing conservation management strategies.


Brief description of teaching and learning methods:

We will learn about conservation in real world settings, and consider and discuss the methods to work in them, using a mix of formal lectures, practical classes, written work and self-study. Students are encouraged to read widely around conservation topics (old and new), especially from perspectives that challenge their existing perceptions. This will provide a flow from individual-based learning to group-based exercises.


Contact hours:
  Autumn Spring Summer
Lectures 15
Seminars 5
Guided independent study:      
    Wider reading (independent) 20
    Wider reading (directed) 10
    Exam revision/preparation 16
    Advance preparation for classes 4
    Preparation for presentations 6
    Preparation for seminars 2
    Completion of formative assessment tasks 4
    Revision and preparation 4
    Essay preparation 14
       
Total hours by term 0 100 0
       
Total hours for module 100

Summative Assessment Methods:
Method Percentage
Written exam 50
Written assignment including essay 40
Class test administered by School 10

Summative assessment- Examinations:

A 90-minute examination: 60 minutes short answer (three questions); 30 minutes multiple-choice questions (10 questions).


Summative assessment- Coursework and in-class tests:


  • Perform a critical review as part of a written assignment

  • A 30-minute online test


Formative assessment methods:

Working in groups (during Practical sessions) students will present material and receive feedback from lecturers and fellow students


Penalties for late submission:
The Module Convener will apply the following penalties for work submitted late:

  • where the piece of work is submitted after the original deadline (or any formally agreed extension to the deadline): 10% of the total marks available for that piece of work will be deducted from the mark for each working day[1] (or part thereof) following the deadline up to a total of five working days;
  • where the piece of work is submitted more than five working days after the original deadline (or any formally agreed extension to the deadline): a mark of zero will be recorded.

  • The University policy statement on penalties for late submission can be found at: http://www.reading.ac.uk/web/FILES/qualitysupport/penaltiesforlatesubmission.pdf
    You are strongly advised to ensure that coursework is submitted by the relevant deadline. You should note that it is advisable to submit work in an unfinished state rather than to fail to submit any work.

    Assessment requirements for a pass:

    A mark of 40% overall.


    Reassessment arrangements:

    By re-examination in August.


    Additional Costs (specified where applicable):

    Last updated: 29 August 2019

    THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS MODULE DESCRIPTION DOES NOT FORM ANY PART OF A STUDENT'S CONTRACT.

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