AP3A106-Horticultural Crop Technology

Module Provider: School of Agriculture, Policy and Development
Number of credits: 20 [10 ECTS credits]
Level:6
Terms in which taught: Autumn / Spring term module
Pre-requisites:
Non-modular pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Modules excluded:
Current from: 2020/1

Module Convenor: Mr Luke Bell

Email: luke.bell@reading.ac.uk

Type of module:

Summary module description:

Crop technologists in the horticulture industry are required to be innovative and to design new technologies to improve production efficiency. Learn about specific aspects of crop technology and the development of new horticultural technologies. Build on your previous knowledge by focusing on subjects in greater detail. Examine advanced technical and scientific elements of horticultural production systems in temperate areas, which illustrate the relationship between plant physiology and genetics. Research these technologies and appraise their potential. Through interactive lectures and seminars, gain experience in evaluating scientific research critically. In addition, learn on the ground during field visits to local farms.


Aims:

This module provides students with an understanding and knowledge of specific aspects of horticultural crop technology. A number of advanced technical and scientific aspects of horticultural production systems in temperate areas are also covered to illustrate the relationship between plant physiology and genetics, and the development of new horticultural technologies. Crop technologists in the horticulture industry are required to be innovative and to design new technologies to improve production efficiency. This module will enable students to research technologies and appraise their potential critically. The course builds on a previous module by studying subjects in greater detail. Interactive lectures will allow the students to gain experience in evaluating scientific research critically.


Assessable learning outcomes:

By the end of the module the student will be able to demonstrate an understanding and knowledge of specific aspects of horticultural crop technology. They will be able to appraise and critically assess the scientific information that supports this knowledge. They will be able to summarise and explain specific aspects of horticultural crop technology and production systems from assembled scientific information.


Additional outcomes:

Students will enhance their presentation and communication skills via a presentation to the other students on a topic of their choice. Self-learning will be encouraged through use of formative quizzes during each semester.


Outline content:

Autumn semester – this is an indicative outline only:
























































































Week 1



Lecture 1



Introduction // Horticultural Robotics



LB

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Week 2



Lecture 2



Technology of fruit crop production under protection



MO



Field trip 1



Field trip



PH/LB



Week 3



Lecture 3



Biotechnology of fruit crops



JD



Week 4



Lecture 4



Control of flowering in fruit crops: apple & strawberry



CT



Week 5



Lecture 5



Post-harvest storage of horticultural crops



LB



Seminar 1



Formative Quiz I



LB



Week 6



 



 



 



Week 7



Lecture 6



Effects of temperature and light on crop growth, development and yield



PH



Week 8



Lecture 7



Field-based imaging technology



LB



Week 9



Lecture 8



The potential of spectral filters for protected cropping



PH



Week 10



Lecture 9



Disease & pest management technologies



LB



Week 11



Lecture 10



Precision irrigation technology



LB



Seminar 2



Formative Quiz II



LB




 



Spring semester:
























































































Week 1



Lecture 11



Responses of vegetable crops to fertiliser inputs



PH



Week 2



Lecture 12



Improvements in vegetable seed technology



LB



Week 3



Lecture 13



Controlled environment research as an adjunct to field experiments



PH



Week 4



Lecture 14



Hydroponic growing systems



PH



Week 5



Lecture 15



CO2 enrichment of glasshouse crops



PH



Seminar 3



Formative Quiz III



LB



Week 6



 



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Week 7



Lecture 16



Development of novel horticultural crops



LB



Week 8



Lecture 17



Vertical and urban farming



LB



Seminar 4



Presentation seminar (preparation session)



LB



Week 9



Lecture 18



Waste reduction & valorisation of horticultural crops



LB



Field Trip 2



Field trip



PH



Week 10



Seminar 5



Presentation seminar (assessed)



LB



Week 11



Seminar 6



Formative Quiz IV



LB




 



CT – Carrie-Anne Twitchen

LB – Luke Bell

MO – Matthew Ordidge

PH – Paul Hadley



The staffing of modules is correct at the time of writing.


Global context:

This module will give students comprehensive knowledge of technologies used in modern horticulture. International students will gain insight into UK production methods, and gain knowledge of how this fits into a global context. The module will also address the implications of global issues such as climate change, urbanisation, and labour shortages on horticultural production and international supply.


Brief description of teaching and learning methods:

A mix of lectures, seminars, field trips, and industry engagement.


Contact hours:
  Autumn Spring Summer
Lectures 20 16
Seminars 4 10
Project Supervision 4
External visits 6 6
Guided independent study:      
    Wider reading (independent) 20 20
    Wider reading (directed) 10 10
    Exam revision/preparation 10 10
    Completion of formative assessment tasks 10
    Group study tasks 4
    Carry-out research project 20 20
       
Total hours by term 100 100 0
       
Total hours for module 200

Summative Assessment Methods:
Method Percentage
Written exam 60
Written assignment including essay 20
Oral assessment and presentation 20

Summative assessment- Examinations:

One, two-hour exam.


Summative assessment- Coursework and in-class tests:

One individual presentation (10 minutes) – week 10, Spring semester



One written report based on independent research (2,500 words) – week 1, Summer term.


Formative assessment methods:

Penalties for late submission:

The Module Convenor will apply the following penalties for work submitted late:

  • where the piece of work is submitted after the original deadline (or any formally agreed extension to the deadline): 10% of the total marks available for that piece of work will be deducted from the mark for each working day[1] (or part thereof) following the deadline up to a total of five working days;
  • where the piece of work is submitted more than five working days after the original deadline (or any formally agreed extension to the deadline): a mark of zero will be recorded.
The University policy statement on penalties for late submission can be found at: http://www.reading.ac.uk/web/FILES/qualitysupport/penaltiesforlatesubmission.pdf
You are strongly advised to ensure that coursework is submitted by the relevant deadline. You should note that it is advisable to submit work in an unfinished state rather than to fail to submit any work.

Assessment requirements for a pass:

Overall mark of 40%.


Reassessment arrangements:

By examination.


Additional Costs (specified where applicable):


  1. Required text books

  2. Specialist equipment or materials

  3. Specialist clothing, footwear or headgear - £50

  4. Printing and binding

  5. Computers and devices, with a particular specification

  6. Travel, accommodation and subsistence


Last updated: 27 July 2020

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS MODULE DESCRIPTION DOES NOT FORM ANY PART OF A STUDENT'S CONTRACT.

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