ECM185-Economics of Social Policy

Module Provider: School of Politics, Economics and International Relations
Number of credits: 20 [10 ECTS credits]
Level:7
Terms in which taught: Spring term module
Pre-requisites:
Non-modular pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Modules excluded:
Module version for: 2017/8

Module Convenor: Dr Simonetta Longhi

Email: s.longhi@reading.ac.uk

Summary module description:
This module is intended to cover the most important social economic policy issues of the day. Consequently, the topics may vary from year-to-year in order to reflect contemporary relevance. But, in each case, the emphasis will be on how economic analysis can contribute to the solution of domestic and international social problems. Indicative topics are: poverty, segregation and social exclusion; the economics of crime; education. It should be noted that Housing Economics, Social Policy of Health and Ageing and Climate Change – which are all important social issues - have separate modules available.

Aims:
The module is intended to equip students with an understanding of contemporary social economic problems and to provide students with the key tools economists use in analysis and policy advice.

Assessable learning outcomes:
At the end of the module, students should:

•Have developed an understanding of the major social economic problems and issues that face the UK and a selection of other countries.
•Have developed an appropriate economic framework and set of tools for analysing the issues
•Be able to analyse the effectiveness or otherwise of different policy options using the toolkit.

Additional outcomes:
Students are required to give class presentations on their projects. Therefore, through the classes, students are encouraged to improve their presentation skills before an audience of their peers. Students also develop their writing, drafting, team work and research skills.

Outline content:
This module is intended to cover the most important social economic policy issues of the day. Consequently, the topics may vary from year-to-year in order to reflect contemporary relevance. But, in each case, the emphasis will be on how economic analysis can contribute to the solution of domestic and international social problems. Indicative topics are: poverty, segregation and social exclusion; the economics of crime; education. It should be noted that Housing Economics, Social Policy of Health & Ageing, and Climate Change - which are all important social issues - are covered in separate modules.

Global context:
Through project work, students are encouraged to conduct international comparative exercises concerning policy issues.

Brief description of teaching and learning methods:
The module uses a combination of lectures, tutorials and workshops. Tutorials are used for students to present the results of their projects to their peers and to encourage discussion of the contrasting experiences of different countries.

Contact hours:
  Autumn Spring Summer
Lectures 21
Tutorials 4
Project Supervision 4
Practicals classes and workshops 4
Guided independent study 147 20
       
Total hours by term 180.00 20.00
       
Total hours for module 200.00

Summative Assessment Methods:
Method Percentage
Written exam 40
Project output other than dissertation 60

Other information on summative assessment:
Students are required to submit two 3,000 word projects. Each project must be submitted by an agreed deadline.

Formative assessment methods:

Penalties for late submission:
Penalties for late submission on this module are in accordance with the University policy. Please refer to page 5 of the Postgraduate Guide to Assessment for further information: http://www.reading.ac.uk/internal/exams/student/exa-guidePG.aspx

Length of examination:
One 2-hour unseen written paper.
Postgraduate examinations are held in the Summer term.

Requirements for a pass:
A minimum weighted average mark of coursework and examination of 50%.

Reassessment arrangements:
Re-examination for all modules takes place in August/September of the same year.
Re-assessment is by examination only; coursework is not included at the second attempt.

Additional Costs (specified where applicable):
1) Required text books:
2) Specialist equipment or materials:
3) Specialist clothing, footwear or headgear:
4) Printing and binding:
5) Computers and devices with a particular specification:
6) Travel, accommodation and subsistence:

Last updated: 31 March 2017

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