CL3SP-Ancient Sparta

Module Provider: Classics
Number of credits: 20 [10 ECTS credits]
Level:6
Terms in which taught: Spring term module
Pre-requisites:
Non-modular pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Modules excluded:
Current from: 2020/1

Module Convenor: Dr James Lloyd

Email: j.t.lloyd@reading.ac.uk

Type of module:

Summary module description:

This module will explore the social and political structures of Spartan society from 750 BCE – c. 300 CE, identifying key figures and events, and historical and archaeological sources (including those in the Ure Museum). We will look at the art, archaeology, epigraphy, and history of ancient Sparta, as well as its modern receptions, providing students with a deep and broad understanding of the available sources. We will also explore how ancient and modern writers and artists thought about Sparta, and how this has contributed to the phenomenon known as the ‘Spartan Mirage’. Students will creatively engage with collections and digital methodologies to explore how new meaning can be brought to old sources, or new and overlooked sources can be given new light.



For this module, just like the Persians at Thermopylae, you’ll have to come and take it!


Aims:

This module is will develop students’ knowledge of the art, archaeology, history, and society of ancient Sparta, as well as the continuing influence of the city’s legacy.


Assessable learning outcomes:

By the end of this module students will be able to:




  • Identify the main periods of Spartan history.

  • Understand the concept of the Spartan Mirage.

  • Critically evaluate individual approaches to the study of Sparta, based on a solid understanding of the problems and methods.

  • Distinguish the main arguments and interpretative theories in the secondary scholarship concerning Sparta.

  • Understand the excavati on, acquisition, and categorisation of archaeological objects from Sparta, based on practical sessions in the Ure Museum.

  • Consider the influence of Sparta on contemporary and subsequent authors, politicians, artists, and philosophers.


Additional outcomes:

The module encourages the development of digital skills through assignments such as object histories, creating database entries, and creative responses.


Outline content:

The module will cover the art, archaeology, epigraphy, and history of ancient Sparta, as well as textual and visual receptions, providing students with a deep and broad understanding of the available sources. We will examine the social and political structure of Spartan society from 750 BCE – c. 300 CE, identifying key figures and events, and historical and archaeological sources (including those in the Ure Museum). We will explore how ancient and modern writers and artists thought abou t Sparta, and how this has contributed to the phenomenon known as the ‘Spartan Mirage’. Students will creatively engage with digital methodologies to explore how new meaning can be brought to old sources, or new and overlooked sources can be given new light.


Global context:

In discussing the reception and legacy of Sparta, we will look at global perspectives.


Brief description of teaching and learning methods:

The module will be taught by lectures (10hrs) and seminars (6hrs), as well as a practical session in the Ure Museum (object study, 2hrs), and computer labs (digital methodologies, 2hrs). It will be assessed by one essay and one digital/ collections-based assignment. Students will be expected to engage with visual and textual sources, making use of the Recogito platform and museum and archive databases.


Contact hours:
  Autumn Spring Summer
Lectures 10
Seminars 6
Practicals classes and workshops 4
Guided independent study:      
    Wider reading (independent) 40
    Wider reading (directed) 58
    Advance preparation for classes 10
    Preparation for seminars 10
    Essay preparation 60
    Reflection 2
       
Total hours by term 0 200 0
       
Total hours for module 200

Summative Assessment Methods:
Method Percentage
Written assignment including essay 50
Portfolio 50

Summative assessment- Examinations:

Summative assessment- Coursework and in-class tests:

(1) One digital / collections-based assignment, with c.1500 word commentary, developed from a list of guiding options, chosen in week 3 and due by 12 noon on Friday week 9 (50%)



(2) One essay, c.3,000 words on a topic chosen from a list, due in by 12 noon on Monday of the first week of Summer Term (50%)


Formative assessment methods:

Feedback will be provided on creative/ digital assignment milestones, and guidance will be given in developing the creative assignment project.



Feedback will be given in preparation for the essay based on in-class presentations.


Penalties for late submission:

The Module Convenor will apply the following penalties for work submitted late:

  • where the piece of work is submitted after the original deadline (or any formally agreed extension to the deadline): 10% of the total marks available for that piece of work will be deducted from the mark for each working day[1] (or part thereof) following the deadline up to a total of five working days;
  • where the piece of work is submitted more than five working days after the original deadline (or any formally agreed extension to the deadline): a mark of zero will be recorded.
The University policy statement on penalties for late submission can be found at: http://www.reading.ac.uk/web/FILES/qualitysupport/penaltiesforlatesubmission.pdf
You are strongly advised to ensure that coursework is submitted by the relevant deadline. You should note that it is advisable to submit work in an unfinished state rather than to fail to submit any work.

Assessment requirements for a pass:

40%


Reassessment arrangements:

Resubmission by 21 August


Additional Costs (specified where applicable):

Last updated: 23 July 2020

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS MODULE DESCRIPTION DOES NOT FORM ANY PART OF A STUDENT'S CONTRACT.

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