Global Crisis, Conflict and Disaster Management

Global Crisis, Conflict and Disaster Mgmt

About LLM or MSc in Global Crisis, Conflict and Disaster Management

Programme duration:

  • Full-time: 12 months (LLM or MSc, Diploma); 6 months (PGCert)
  • Part-time: 36 months (LLM or MSc); 24 months (PGDiploma/PGCertificate)
  • Programme commences in late September only

Flood reliefThe number, intensity, and impact of crises, emergencies, conflicts and disasters are increasing. During the past ten years alone, an estimated 1.5 billion people were affected by some form of disaster, complex or conflict-related event.

These exciting, timely, dynamic and innovative multidisciplinary postgraduate taught programmes examine the role of global (i.e. national, regional and international) law, policy and practice across the spectrum of possible crises, conflicts (e.g. civil, international, post-conflict peace-building, terrorism), 'man-made' (eg pollution, contamination) and 'natural' (e.g. earthquakes, cyclones, tsunamis, health pandemics, wildfires) disasters. It considers the complete disaster cycle of prevention, mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery. The programmes reflect current and changing global priorities such as the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-30; progressing the outputs of the UN Climate Change Conference 2015; UN Sustainable Development Goals 2015; and the World Humanitarian Summit 2016.

The overarching aim is to equip students with many of the substantive, professional, practical, and personal transferable skills and knowledge necessary to operate effectively in inherently multidisciplinary crisis, conflict and/or disaster environment(s).

The programme is expected to appeal especially to Law and non-Law graduates who are early to mid-career professionals working in roles dealing with different types of crises, conflicts and/or disasters, particularly governmental, intergovernmental, private/corporate, civil society/non-governmental who wish to broaden and deeper their existing areas of expertise. It will be suitable too for recent graduates, those on career breaks, and career changers.

BiohazardIt is possible to take an LLM or MSc pathway. Both are framed around the global architecture of crisis, conflict and disaster management with embedded multidisciplinarity. The key distinction is that an LLM route takes more optional law modules, whereas optional modules for the MSc are more multidisciplinary in nature.

It is anticipated that participating schools will include: Law; Agriculture, Policy and Development; Politics, Economics and International Relations; Archaeology, Geography, and Environmental Science. There will be input from other disciplinary perspectives too, together with practitioners drawn from across the conflict, humanitarian and disasters sectors.

The programme features a combination of compulsory and optional Law and non-Law modules, providing flexibility and allowing you to tailor this programme to meet your own interests and ambitions. Law modules on offer cover a broad range of different international law subjects, including Global Architecture of Crisis, Conflict and Disaster Management; Human Rights Law, Policy, and Practice; International Law and the Regulation of Armed Conflict; Technologies and Weaponry; Disaster Management; Hazard, Risk, Vulnerability and Resilience; International Criminal Law and Post-Conflict Peacebuilding; Climate Change Disasters; International Refugee Law; Public International Law; Research Project; Professional Placement. Non-Law modules available include in topics such as: International Development (eg foundational concepts, food security, gender); Politics and International Relations (eg contemporary diplomacy, conflict in the Middle East, terrorism); Economics (eg macro/micro-economics for developing countries, economics of public/social policy, climate change and economics); and Flooding.

Additionally, a series of non-assessed, employability orientated practical training events, inside and outside the classroom, will take place throughout the programmes. Such training opportunities are aimed at consolidating and applying substantive knowledge learnt as well as developing transferrable professional and personal skills. This will include the opportunity to undertake a fantastic and unique practical 'fragile/hostile environment training' package delivered by external professional trainers.[1]

[1] Subject to payment of an additional fee, and a minimum number of students wishing to take this element.

Drone UAVOverarching themes and questions include: the relationship between different legal regimes; what role law does and should have in responding to crisis, conflict, or disaster situations; the relationship between law and other non-legal disciplines; sustainability; resilience; disaster risk reduction; and disaster management. The programme further considers the development of new legal norms, such as international disaster law and disaster risk reduction law. Much of the teaching is research-led around these and other important and current global issues.

EarthquakeAs well as specific knowledge of international law, this programme will develop your ability to think analytically, critically and creatively, to produce reasoned arguments encompassing policy, existing practice and knowledge at an advanced level. It will also develop your academic and professional transferable skills, including the ability to conduct independent research, both online and offline; time management, verbal and written communication, use of information technology tools, presenting and planning, and collaborate effectively in a team environment. For example, examining issues through legal lenses, students will develop the ability to distinguish more effectively between persuasive and unpersuasive arguments. Similarly, they will refine their ability to resolve complex problems, as well as to frame credible, coherent, and persuasive arguments from a range of perspectives. Students will further learn how to identify and draw upon credible, reliable research sources which form an essential aspect of persuasive argument. Through feedback given on formative and assessed work, students will grow as independent, self-critical, and confident commentators on law, policy, and practice matters.

The following number of credits must be completed:

LLM (180 credits):

This programme may be completed in one of two ways:

  1. 140 credits of taught modules are taken (of which a minimum of 100 credits must be Law modules) plus LWMPRO Professional Project (40 credits); or
  2. 140 credits of taught modules are taken (of which a minimum of 100 credits must be Law modules) plus LWMPLA Professional Placement (40 credits).

Outstanding credits may be completed with Law or non-Law optional modules.

Law and non-Law graduates with no previous academic or professional experience in public international law, a third core module is LWMTPU Public International Law (10 credits).

PGDiploma (120 credits):

Of the 120 credits, students must normally complete the core modules. The LWMPRO Research Project and LWMPLA Professional Placement modules are not offered as optional modules for the Diploma. However, in the event of a student taking either of these modules as part of the LLM but failing to achieve the required passes in the taught modules, successful completion of LWMPRO or LWMPLA will count towards the award of a Diploma if all other requirements have been met.

Law and non-Law graduates with no previous academic or professional experience in public international law, a third core module is LWMTPU Public International Law (10 credits).

PGCertificate (60 credits):

The Certificate consists of 60 credits of taught law modules only. Of the 60 credits, students must normally complete the core modules. Law and non-Law graduates with no previous academic or professional experience in public international law, a third core module is LWMTPU Public International Law (10 credits).

MSc (180 credits):

This programme may be completed in one of two ways:

  1. 140 credits of taught modules are taken (of which a minimum of 80 credits [tbc] must be Law modules) plus LWMPRO Professional Project (40 credits); or
  2. 140 credits of taught modules are taken (of which a minimum of 80 credits [tbc] must be Law modules) plus LWMPLA Professional Placement (40 credits).

Outstanding credits may be completed with Law or non-Law optional modules.

Law and non-Law graduates with no previous academic or professional experience in public international law are strongly encouraged to take LWMTPU Public International Law (10 credits).

PGDiploma (120 credits):

Of the 120 credits, students must normally complete the core modules. The LWMPRO Research Project and LWMPLA Professional Placement modules are not offered as optional modules for the Diploma. However, in the event of a student taking either of these modules as part of the MSc but failing to achieve the required passes in the taught modules, successful completion of LWMPRO or LWMPLA will count towards the award of a Diploma if all other requirements have been met.

Law and non-Law graduates with no previous academic or professional experience in public international law are strongly encouraged to take LWMTPU Public International Law (10 credits).

PGCertificate (60 credits):

The Certificate consists of 60 credits of taught law modules only. Of the 60 credits, students must normally complete core modules. Law and non-Law graduates with no previous academic or professional experience in public international law are strongly encouraged to take LWMTPU Public International Law (10 credits).

Certificate of Completion (normally 10 or 20 credits):

It is also possible for students with easy access to the University of Reading to undertake a Certificate of Completion for individual Law modules. Any credits completed for the Certificate of Completion, PGCertificate and PGDiploma are transferable to other entry points, subject to certain restrictions including time lapses between completion of previous credits.

Please note that the Certificate of Completion option is only suitable for students who do not require a visa to study in the UK, and who live in sufficient proximity to the University of Reading to be able to physically attend the seminars. We regret, but no distance learning option is available.

Students will be eligible for a 10% fees discount if they are currently employed by a recognised NGO, have left such NGO employment within 6 calendar months prior to enrolment on the programme, or will commence employment with such an NGO within 3 calendar months of graduating from the programme. It will be necessary to produce appropriate documentary evidence of NGO employment to qualify for this discount. This discount is not applicable to externally provided training such as the fragile/hostile environment training.

Staff teaching on these LLM/MSc programmes include:

Mrs Marie Aronsson

Marie Aronsson

e.m.l.aronsson@reading.ac.uk

Dr Alison Bisset

Alison Bisset

a.j.bisset@reading.ac.uk

+44 (0)118 378 5672

Professor Susan Breau

Head of School
Susan Breau

s.c.breau@reading.ac.uk

+44 (0)118 378 7509

Professor James Green

James Green

j.a.green@reading.ac.uk

+44 (0)118 378 8592

Dr Lawrence Hill-Cawthorne

Lawrence-Hill-Cawthorne_s

l.hill-cawthorne@reading.ac.uk

+44 (0)118 378 6911

Professor Chris Hilson

Chris Hilson

c.j.hilson@reading.ac.uk

+44 (0)118 378 7501

Professor Chris Newdick

Chris Newdick

c.newdick@reading.ac.uk

+44 (0)118 378 7525

Dr Katja Samuel

Programme Director:
LLM/MSc in Global Crisis and Disaster Management
Dr Katja Samuel

k.l.samuel@reading.ac.uk

+44 (0)118 378 7125

Dr Alina Tryfonidou

Alina Tryfonidou

a.tryfonidou@reading.ac.uk

+44 (0)118 378 5643

Dr Reuven (Ruvi) Ziegler

Ruvi Ziegler

r.ziegler@reading.ac.uk

+44 (0)118 378 7518

Career prospects

The skills gained by undertaking a postgraduate Law degree are in great demand from both legal and non-legal employers. As with any postgraduate taught Law programme, completion of the various entry points will be an asset for students seeking employment in international courts and tribunals, United Nations agencies, legal practice and advocacy in the international law field, international NGOs, the public service (in the areas of foreign relations, international development, etc), law reform agencies, the media (journalism and broadcasting) and academia (with further postgraduate study).

More specifically, the programmes' unique emphasis on the all-round development of students in terms of not only substantive knowledge but also personal and practical transferable skills; the embedding of multidisciplinarity throughout the programme which will enable students to recognise and interact more effectively between different disciplines and actors; the programme's framing around the architecture of global law and its interaction with the policies, standards, cultures and practices of a range of legal actors; and its emphasis on examining how theory translates to practice (or, in some instances, does not), are all likely to situate graduates of this programme strongly in the marketplace in terms of their future employability. The programme's approach and outcomes are of national, regional and international relevance and applicability.

The knowledge and skills acquired will prepare students for a broad range of academic, research, policy, management, and operational roles across the conflict, crisis, humanitarian, disaster risk reduction and response sectors, both public and private. These include, but are not limited to governments, international organisations, corporations, industry, NGOs, charities, academia, the media, and the military.

The future employability of programme graduates is expected to be excellent, with graduates uniquely positioned and clearly distinguishable to prospective employers. Not only will they have knowledge in key principles and topics associated with traditional Public International Law and Human Rights related LLM programmes, but graduates will also acquire unique understanding of cutting edge law and policy (e.g. international disaster/disaster risk reduction law), become more multidisciplinary conversant, and acquire professional, personal and practical transferable skills.

For more information, please contact:

Dr Katja Samuel

Associate Professor in Global Security and Disaster Law

Programme Director

k.l.samuel@reading.ac.uk

Tel: +44 (0)118 378 7125

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