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The walrus’s whiskers and the mouse’s moustache: why do animals have whiskers? – University of Reading

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The walrus’s whiskers and the mouse’s moustache: why do animals have whiskers?

Dr Robyn Grant, Manchester Metropolitan University.Nearly all mammals have whiskers – sensory tactile hairs, also known as vibrissae. In fact, whiskers are only truly absent in a handful of species, including humans. However, much of what we know about whiskers comes from studying just a few species, such as laboratory rats and mice. In this presentation, I will present a snapshot of what is known about how different species use their whiskers, drawing information from studies of whisker anatomy, development, evolution, and function. In particular, I will answer the following questions: how do whiskers work, develop, and evolve? And what are they for? I will also consider the applications of whisker research for mammalian behaviour, welfare, and conservation.

For more information and to book you place, please email: berksmammals@gmail.com or visit berksmammals.org.uk

Event information

Date

02 December 2021

Time

19:15-20:30

Location

Online

Contact

berksmammals.org.uk

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