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Families become Greek Olympians for the day – University of Reading

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Families become Greek Olympians for the day

Release Date 28 July 2006

statue of a discus throwerFamilies will discover what it was like to compete in the ancient Greek Olympic Games when the Ure Museum at the University of Reading holds its 'Oil and Olympics: Athletics in Ancient Greece' event on Thursday 3 August from 11am – 4pm. During this all day event, children will take part in races and the winners will experience the glory of being a Greek athlete when they are crowned. Other activities will include making an aryballos (oil jars) and a strigil (which the Greeks used to scrape oil away after exercise). Families will learn how the games were organised, who participated in them and whether ancient sports were a means of preparing youth for warfare. The earliest Olympic games began more than two and a half thousand years ago and athletics were very important in ancient Greece. The athletes of the ancient world achieved fame and glory through their endeavours very much like the footballers of today. The word athlete is an ancient Greek word that means "one who competes for a prize" and athletes regularly received prizes worth substantial amounts of money as well as bronze tripods, shields, woollen cloaks, and olive oil. Many modern sports have their roots in antiquity. The javelin and discuss were all used by the Greeks and they enjoyed running, wrestling and boxing! Admission is £2.50 each for children and accompanying adults get to join the fun for free. Please bring your own packed lunch. For further details contact Lynette Fortey on 0118 378 6990 or email ure.education@reading.ac.uk. Ends For media enquiries please contact: Eleanor Holmes Press Officer T: 0118 378 6166 E: e.m.holmes@reading.ac.uk

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