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Reading Student takes Taylor Woodrow Dissertation Prize – University of Reading

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Reading Student takes Taylor Woodrow Dissertation Prize

Release Date 04 January 2006

Iain Casagranda with Lawrence ParnellPictured against the striking K2 building, developed by Taylor Woodrow and opposite the Tower of London, is Iain Casagranda (left), winner of Taylor Woodrow's prize for a dissertation on innovation affecting the property and construction sector. The award is given annually to a UK enrolled student associated with the University of Reading's MBA course in Construction and Real Estate. Iain is pictured with Lawrence Parnell, Project Management Director at Taylor Woodrow. Iain's dissertation was entitled The Human Side of Enterprise – An investigation into the effect of Work Life Balance (WLB) policies on employee perceived performance outcomes within construction and real estate organisations. Iain, a director of Urbenzyme, suggests that a reciprocal relationship exists between the employer's provision of specific WLB policies and the amount of commitment an employee feels towards his employer. The relationship is strongest when the policies are actively encouraged by the employee's direct supervisor and are meaningful to the employee's quality of life. The dissertation concludes employers should align WLB policies with job related objectives and goals. Tailoring WLB policies was more efficient than a 'one size fits all approach'. As Project Manager of Urbenzyme's £500m mixed use scheme in Istanbul, Iain is currently applying a wide range of WLB policies to an international team and believes it will create a more harmonious and productive working environment. End Notes to editors The dissertation award is just one of the initiatives that demonstrate Taylor Woodrow's commitment to the development of young people within the construction industry. The company believes providing schemes that give young people a step up on the career ladder is essential in addressing skills shortages within the industry. Taylor Woodrow announced an increase in the number of young people on its Sponsored Students' Scheme by over one third in 2005 – and plans to expand the programme still further this year. Eighty-four students will be taking part in the Taylor Woodrow scheme during the 2005/6 academic year – an increase of 35% on the previous year. This figure is set to rise next year, with 30 new students currently being recruited to join the company's three to four year programme in September 2006. The recruitment drive is a result of Taylor Woodrow's continued growth, including expansion in its facilities management and infrastructure divisions. In another initiative Taylor Woodrow's Facilities Management division is jointly funding a research associate through the Government's Knowledge Transfer Partnership Programme, in conjunction with John Moore University, Liverpool. The three year research programme seeks to understand how innovation is applied in a facilities management context across a multi-contract operation through a large, diverse supply chain delivery model. It will examine how different organisations perceive and measure value in terms of its support functions. Taylor Woodrow Construction is a subsidiary of Taylor Woodrow Plc. Taylor Woodrow Construction's primary business is in repeat services for 'Blue Chip' clients, facilities management, Private Finance Initiatives (PFIs) and expert support to Taylor Woodrow's housing and development operations. Taylor Woodrow plc is listed on the London Stock Exchange and in the year ending 31 December 2004 turnover increased to £3.3 billion. For further information please visit the company's website – http://www.taylorwoodrow.com http://www.taylorwoodrow.com/construction For further press information or photography, please contact: Louise Nicholson PR Manager Taylor Woodrow Construction 01923 478 538 07816 511158 Louise.Nicholson@uk.taylorwoodrow.com Heather Power Haslimann Taylor PR 0121 355 3446 heather@haslimanntaylor.com

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