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University of Reading top of the class in training primary school teachers! – University of Reading

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University of Reading top of the class in training primary school teachers!

Release Date 07 September 2009

Noisy playgrounds and the sound of bells at the beginning of September can mean only one thing. During this first week of the new school term, the Institute of Education at the University of Reading is delighted to announce it has been named as the number one place to train primary school teachers, according to the 2009 Good Teacher Training Guide.

Reading ticked all the boxes to lead the primary education table, with its 'top' Ofsted rating one of the deciding factors. Reading also scored highly for entry qualifications and the very high ratio of its trainees who go on to be teachers.

The Guide is produced by the University of Buckingham every year, and summarises the extensive data collected by the Training and Development Agency for Schools. It produces league tables for providers of both primary and secondary teacher training. Taking into account both areas, Reading finished a superb 11th out of 76 Universities who provide teacher training.

Professor Andy Goodwyn, Director of the University's Institute of Education said: "We are delighted and extremely proud of our Good Teacher Training Guide results. It shows that Reading is the number one place to begin a career in primary school teaching and that we offer our graduates the best opportunity of employment. It also highlights the expertise of our staff as well as the fantastic relationship we have with local schools."

Frances Taylor was studying French at Glasgow University when she decided to embark on a career as a primary school teacher. After completing the University of Reading PGCE Programme, she is enjoying her role as a newly qualified teacher at Birch Copse Primary School in Tilehurst, Reading.

Frances said: "I had heard of Reading's good reputation through reading various articles online. The more research I did the more it appealed to me, and when I found out that I would be able to study French as a specialism along with my PGCE, my decision to apply was confirmed.

"Reading's course allows you to experience the primary curriculum for yourself. For example, in science we carried out real experiments, in PE I played basketball for the first time in years and in music we got to play a variety of instruments. Importantly, this allowed us to think from a child's perspective."

Graduates from the University of Reading's teacher training programmes have a wonderful chance of finding a job after they qualify. Last year, 96% of its PGCE graduates found work.

Frances Taylor continued: "The careers advice given to us was nothing short of excellent and helped me prepare thoroughly for my interview. The course also equipped me with skills integral to my development as a teacher, namely an appreciation and deeper understanding of different learning styles and a thorough understanding of the benefits of giving children ownership of their learning. I also learned some excellent behaviour management and assessment techniques."

For more information about a beginning a teaching career at the University of Reading, please contact Sameer Lakhani, email s.r.lakhani@reading.ac.uk or telephone 0118 378 8837

Ends

For all University of Reading media enquiries please contact James Barr, Press Officer tel 0118 378 7115 or email j.w.barr@reading.ac.uk

Notes to Editors:

The University of Reading's Institute of Education is a major provider of teachers nationally and regionally, offering PGCE Secondary and Primary, BA (Ed) and the Graduate Teacher Programmes (GTP). The secondary programme and the primary programme have both received the top Ofsted grades in 2006/7 and the Institute is now a category 'A' provider for all our courses. The employment rates of graduates are the highest in the University and the best in the country of any initial teacher training provider.

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