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Laughing gas makes better chocolate – University of Reading

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Laughing gas makes better chocolate

Release Date 18 July 2005

chocolate being madeUsing nitrous oxide – or "laughing gas" – to put the bubbles in chocolate produces a more intense, melt-in-the-mouth flavour, according to Chemistry & Industry magazine. Gases like carbon dioxide or nitrogen are commonly used to produce the air bubbles in aerated chocolates like Aero. Researchers at the University's School of Food Biosciences tested the effects of aeration with four gases – nitrous oxide, nitrogen, argon and carbon dioxide – on the sensory properties of chocolate batches provided by Nestle. A panel of 20 non-expert testers said that chocolate aerated using laughing gas had the most intense cocoa flavour. Chocolate aerated with argon or nitrogen, which produce small bubbles, was perceived as harder and creamier because the chocolate takes longer to melt in the mouth. Chocolate aerated using carbon dioxide or laughing gas, which produce larger bubbles, melted rapidly in the mouth. "This study illustrates, for the first time, the sensory response of bubble-included chocolates in relation to bubble size," said lead researcher Dr Keshavan Niranjan. Bubbles are undervalued as a food ingredient, he says. "They can be used to add novel textures, structures and mouth-feels, without adding any extra calories." The results will be presented at the Institute of Food Technologist's Annual Meeting in New Orleans on 19th July 2005. End Notes for editors Please acknowledge Chemistry & Industry as the source of these items. If publishing online, please include a hyperlink to http://www.chemind.org Please note Chemistry & Industry uses '&' in its title, please do not correct to 'and'. About Chemistry & Industry Chemistry & Industry magazine from SCI delivers news and comment from the interface between science and business. As well as covering industry and science, it focuses on developments that will be of significant commercial interest in five- to ten-years time. Published twice-monthly and free to SCI Members, it also carries authoritative features and reviews. Opinion-formers worldwide respect Chemistry & Industry for its independent insight. About SCI SCI is a unique international forum where science meets business on independent, impartial ground. Anyone can join, and the Society offers a chance to share information between sectors as diverse as food and agriculture, pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, environmental science and safety. As well as publishing new research and running events, SCI has a growing database of member specialists who can give background information on a wide range of scientific issues. Originally established in 1881, SCI is a registered charity with members in over 70 countries. For further information, please contact: Jacqueline Ali Society of Chemical Industry press@soci.org +44 (0) 20 7598 1573

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