PY3AV-Active Vision

Module Provider: Psychology
Number of credits: 10 [5 ECTS credits]
Level:6
Terms in which taught: Autumn term module
Pre-requisites: PY2CN2 Cognition 2 or PY2RM Research Methods and Data Analysis
Non-modular pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Modules excluded:
Module version for: 2017/8

Module Convenor: Dr Eugene McSorley

Email: e.mcsorley@reading.ac.uk

Summary module description:
Active Vision

Aims:
Students will be given a broad overview of how we move our eyes in order to interact with our visual environment from basic science point of view to real-world applications. Students will be able to demonstrate their understanding of the role of eye movements in everyday tasks in their final examination.

Assessable learning outcomes:
By the end of the module students will be able to:
1.Critically analyse research on eye movements and environments
2. Identify their own eye movement behaviour and critically examine how the construction of environments affects how they move around it.

Additional outcomes:
Students will gain experience from participating in evaluative discussions of research and theory in large and small groups.

Outline content:
The module comprises seven two-hour seminars.

We move our eyes 150,000 times a day (three to four movements per second) in order to gather information from our environment. As a result visual behaviour is not a passive process, instead it is active and results from the interaction between the visual system and the environment. It is vital that we understand how this process occurs and what this can tell us about how we carry out everyday tasks. This has been termed “Active Vision”. This course is an introduction to this alternative way of thinking about visual perception and cognition. The content will include studies of attention, visual search, reading, and everyday tasks.

Seminars involve lectures and student presentations. During the course of the module, students will either prepare a poster presentation.

Brief description of teaching and learning methods:
Seminars involve lectures and evaluative discussion.

Contact hours:
  Autumn Spring Summer
Seminars 14
Guided independent study 86
       
Total hours by term 100.00
       
Total hours for module 100.00

Summative Assessment Methods:
Method Percentage
Written exam 75
Written assignment including essay 25

Other information on summative assessment:
This module is assessed through coursework (25%) and a final exam (75%).
The 1.5-hour Summer Exam will require students to answer 1 essay question on topics covered in the module.
Coursework will comprise a poster presentation.

Formative assessment methods:
Students have the opportunity to provide the module convenor with up to two essay plans for comment and feedback in preparation for the exam.

Penalties for late submission:
The Module Convenor will apply the following penalties for work submitted late, in accordance with the University policy.

  • where the piece of work is submitted up to one calendar week after the original deadline (or any formally agreed extension to the deadline): 10% of the total marks available for the piece of work will be deducted from the mark for each working day (or part thereof) following the deadline up to a total of five working days;
  • where the piece of work is submitted more than five working days after the original deadline (or any formally agreed extension to the deadline): a mark of zero will be recorded.

  • The University policy statement on penalties for late submission can be found at: http://www.reading.ac.uk/web/FILES/qualitysupport/penaltiesforlatesubmission.pdf
    You are strongly advised to ensure that coursework is submitted by the relevant deadline. You should note that it is advisable to submit work in an unfinished state rather than to fail to submit any work.

    Length of examination:
    1.5 hours

    Requirements for a pass:
    A mark of 40% overall

    Reassessment arrangements:
    Reassessment is by re-examination in August/September

    Additional Costs (specified where applicable):

    Last updated: 31 March 2017

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