PO3WPE-War, Peace and International Ethics

Module Provider: School of Politics, Economics and International Relations
Number of credits: 20 [10 ECTS credits]
Level:6
Terms in which taught: Autumn / Spring / Summer module
Pre-requisites:
Non-modular pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Modules excluded:
Module version for: 2017/8

Module Convenor: Prof Alan Cromartie

Email: a.d.t.cromartie@reading.ac.uk

Summary module description:
This module is about the ethical dimension of international relations in peace and war. While this module focuses on issues within moral thought and theory, it does so with an eye to real world conflicts. Among the issues discussed are war crimes and moral responsibility, strategic bombing, revolutionary war, terrorism, and peacemaking.

Aims:

Assessable learning outcomes:
By the end of the module it is intended that the student will be able to
• demonstrate knowledge and understanding of basic forms of moral reasoning and of diverse ethical conceptions of war and international relations;
• analyse and evaluate moral problems arising from the conduct of international relations in peace and war, including the application of relevant moral principles and concepts and the use of empirical material as exemplification;
• appreciate the ways in which fact and value interact in the development of moral argument and in the formation of moral judgement.

Additional outcomes:
The module also aims to develop critical and reflective thinking, effective and independent use of a variety of sources, coherent and rigorous written and oral argumentation, and the ability to work with and learn from others.

Outline content:
The following module content is indicative and may be subject to minor changes:
This module is about the ethical dimension of international relations in peace and war. It examines the ethical issues raised by contrasting conceptions of the international order as a whole, including the impact of state sovereignty and cultural and moral diversity on the status of international law and morality and on questions of human rights, international justice and environmental ethics. More particularly, this module focuses on the ethics of war. It examines the rival images of war exhibited by realism, militarism, pacifism and the just war tradition and explores the modes of justification and criticism and the principles and concepts commonly employed in the moral analysis of war. While this module focuses on issues within moral thought and theory, it does so with an eye to real world conflicts. Among the issues discussed are war crimes and moral responsibility, strategic bombing, revolutionary war, terrorism, and peacemaking.

Global context:
This module concerns issues of international ethics and and also touches on international law; it concerns the interaction between states and between states and non-state bodies.

Brief description of teaching and learning methods:
One hour lecture and a related one and half hour seminar each week for five weeks in each of the Autumn and Spring terms. For the seminars, all students are required to do preparatory reading and in which student presentations are followed by group discussion. Two hours revision class.

Contact hours:
  Autumn Spring Summer
Lectures 5 5
Seminars 7.5 7.5 2
Guided independent study 61 62 50
       
Total hours by term 73.50 74.50 52.00
       
Total hours for module 200.00

Summative Assessment Methods:
Method Percentage
Written exam 50
Written assignment including essay 50

Other information on summative assessment:
Students will write one essay 4,000 words on a selected topic. Non-submitted essays will be awarded a mark of zero. This will account for 50% of the final module mark.

Visiting students will follow the same assessments but only those enrolled for the summer term will sit the examination. Those visiting students who are here for Autumn and Spring terms only but wish to gain full credits will also write a 4,000 word essay in place of the examination, to be submitted by the first day of the summer term. Visiting students who are only studying for half credits will submit one 4,000 word essay in total.

Formative assessment methods:
Every student will give at least one seminar presentation, lasting five to ten minutes. Active participation in seminars is expected by all students.

Penalties for late submission:
The Module Convenor will apply the following penalties for work submitted late, in accordance with the University policy.

  • where the piece of work is submitted up to one calendar week after the original deadline (or any formally agreed extension to the deadline): 10% of the total marks available for the piece of work will be deducted from the mark for each working day (or part thereof) following the deadline up to a total of five working days;
  • where the piece of work is submitted more than five working days after the original deadline (or any formally agreed extension to the deadline): a mark of zero will be recorded.

  • The University policy statement on penalties for late submission can be found at: http://www.reading.ac.uk/web/FILES/qualitysupport/penaltiesforlatesubmission.pdf
    You are strongly advised to ensure that coursework is submitted by the relevant deadline. You should note that it is advisable to submit work in an unfinished state rather than to fail to submit any work.

    Length of examination:
    One three-hour examination.

    Requirements for a pass:
    University-wide rules apply.

    Reassessment arrangements:
    Candidates who fail their final year normally have the right to be re-examined on one further occasion at the next opportunity. These candidates will not normally be eligible for Honours (ie., only a ‘Pass’ classification would be attainable). Students who are eligible for re-assessment have the right to re-assessment in all elements (coursework and re-examination) even if they have previously passed one of those elements. It is expected, however, that the majority of students would probably elect not to repeat an element in which they had already passed, in which case the confirmed marks would be carried forward.

    Examination: Re-examination takes place in August/September of the same year.

    Coursework: Failed or missing coursework should be re-submitted by 1st August, emailed directly to politics@reading.ac.uk, AND submitted on Blackboard.



    Additional Costs (specified where applicable):
    1) Required text books:
    2) Specialist equipment or materials:
    3) Specialist clothing, footwear or headgear:
    4) Printing and binding: There may be optional costs associated with photocopying or printing sources listed on the reading list relating to this module. Please note that the Library charges approximately 5p per photocopy.
    5) Computers and devices with a particular specification:
    6) Travel, accommodation and subsistence:

    Last updated: 31 March 2017

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