MNM3G015-Managing International Human Resource Management

Module Provider: Henley Business School
Number of credits: 10 [5 ECTS credits]
Level:NA
Terms in which taught: Autumn / Spring / Summer module
Pre-requisites:
Non-modular pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Modules excluded:
Current from: 2020/1

Module Convenor: Dr Elizabeth Houldsworth

Email: liz.houldsworth@henley.ac.uk

Type of module:

Summary module description:

This elective seeks to equip managers who will be working in organisations operating internationally to better understand the challenges of managing people in different locations.  It considers the how the forces referred to as ‘globalisation’ and the increasing dominance of multinational enterprises has impacted people management.  In particular it considers the spread of U.S derived ‘best practices’ whilst also providing a critique of this in terms of its universal applicability in different locations around the globe.  


Aims:

This elective pathway aims to equip learners to better understand the challenges of managing human resources in an increasingly global environment.


Assessable learning outcomes:

By the end of the module it is expected that programme members should be able to:





• define the impact of globalisation on the management of people

• outline a theoretical framework for understanding the forces that make management practices more similar worldwide and those, such as culture and context, which ensure that differences remain

• appreciate the challenges that might apply in the implementation of different huma n  resource management practices  in different locations. 


Additional outcomes:

Effectively organise, plan, and work towards the completion of their studies. • Understand and apply the principles of critical analysis. • Communicate their analysis effectively through a written report. • Appropriately apply IHRM theory to practice


Outline content:

The module has three sections: 



- Comparative HRM theory: key theoretical frameworks of globalisation, internationalisation and regionalism and other factors such as institutional theory. The debates of universalism vs contextual, convergence vs divergence, globally integrated vs locally adaptive.  The importance of context in understanding IHRM



- Contextual factors shaping HRM: key theoretical frameworks necessary to understand human resource management in context. The focus is upon:




  • theories around culture

  • institutional theory



- Comparative HRM in practice: understanding how context impacts the deployment of HRM practices with a particular focus upon:




  • time off

  • reward



- International HRM theory and practice: internationalisation in terms of ethnocentric, polycentric, geoc entric or regiocentric.  Global integration vs local adaptation.  Management of  expatriates.



- Towards Global managers: Considers whether there is a global cadre of managers emerging – shared set of competencies.  Ends with a study of careers of MBA graduates across 5 regions including: UK and Ireland, Central  Europe; Northern Europe;  Southern Africa;  Caribbean



 


Global context:

Given the content of the module international case studies are used. Students will be encouraged to reflect on their own experiences within international organisations.


Brief description of teaching and learning methods:

The primary learning transmission will be through self-study, supported with a one day workshop. Participants will receive learning materials online, which will consist of a study guide and a practice application document. An assignment brief is also provided.


Contact hours:
  Autumn Spring Summer
Lectures 7
Work-based learning 5
Guided independent study:      
    Wider reading (independent) 20
    Wider reading (directed) 18
    Essay preparation 50
       
Total hours by term 0 0
       
Total hours for module 100

Summative Assessment Methods:
Method Percentage
Written assignment including essay 100

Summative assessment- Examinations:

Summative assessment- Coursework and in-class tests:

At the completion of the module, programme members will be required to submit an individual written assignment of 3,500 words (+20%/-10%).


Formative assessment methods:

Students work through study material developing skill and knowledge as they progress


Penalties for late submission:
Penalties for late submission on this module are in accordance with the University policy. Please refer to page 5 of the Postgraduate Guide to Assessment for further information: http://www.reading.ac.uk/internal/exams/student/exa-guidePG.aspx

Assessment requirements for a pass:

The pass mark for the individual assignment is 50%


Reassessment arrangements:

Reassessment by 100% assignment (capped at 50%); to be submitted within 6 weeks of notification of module failure, date dependent on cohort entry and to be advised by the Programme Administrator.


Additional Costs (specified where applicable):

Last updated: 4 April 2020

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS MODULE DESCRIPTION DOES NOT FORM ANY PART OF A STUDENT'S CONTRACT.

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