IDM066-Communication and Innovation in Development

Module Provider: School of Agriculture, Policy and Development
Number of credits: 10 [5 ECTS credits]
Level:7
Terms in which taught: Autumn term module
Pre-requisites:
Non-modular pre-requisites: Admission onto module by GIIDAE
Co-requisites:
Modules excluded:
Module version for: 2017/8

Module Convenor: Dr Sarah Cardey

Email: s.p.cardey@reading.ac.uk

Summary module description:
The module explores current ideas about the role of communication in technological and behaviour change in the context of social and economic development.

Aims:
The aim of this module is to develop an understanding of, and ability to analyse, how social and technological change in development contexts is influenced by communication processes.

Assessable learning outcomes:
By the end of the module, it is expected that the student will be able to:
- describe different theoretical approaches to the links between communication and development
- use appropriate theories of communication, learning and behaviour change to design and assess methods for supporting innovation in livelihoods
- identify different traditions in the theory and practice of using communication for social and behavioural change and apply these to an analysis of specific cases in the fields of health and social development
- summarise current debates on privatisation, decentralisation, contracting out and cost recovery for advisory services in the social and natural resources sectors
- describe current trends in communication infrastructure and access and critically assess the potential implications for social and economic development.

Additional outcomes:
- participants will have enhanced their skills in accessing relevant information and resources on the Internet and the academic literature, and in participating in online discussions.

Outline content:
- Theories of communication, development and behaviour change
- Competing conceptual frameworks for explaining and promoting rural innovation
- The role of information, knowledge and communication in social, technical and economic change
- The changing landscape of communication infrastructure and access in developed and developing countries
- Communication for social and behavioural change: competing theories and their implications for communication policy and practice
- Institutional arrangements for finance and delivery of advisory services in health and natural resources sectors: models of decentralisation and pluralism
- Gender and equity issues in communication and innovation.

Brief description of teaching and learning methods:
Lectures, group and individual projects, selected readings, and case studies. Students will be expected to consult materials on the Internet (World Wide Web) and relevant academic journals: references to key websites and journal papers will be given. The module is supported by a "Blackboard" course in which all module participants will be enrolled and will be expected to participate. Discussion and feedback will take place through Blackboard and e-mail as well as during class sessions.

Contact hours:
  Autumn Spring Summer
Lectures 20
Guided independent study 80
       
Total hours by term 100.00
       
Total hours for module 100.00

Summative Assessment Methods:
Method Percentage
Written assignment including essay 60
Class test administered by School 40

Other information on summative assessment:
The Module will be assessed by three pieces of coursework:

1) a test in the final week of the Autumn Term (40%)
2) a 2500 word (maximum) essay to be submitted by the end of the first week of the Spring Term (60%).

Formative assessment methods:

Penalties for late submission:
Penalties for late submission on this module are in accordance with the University policy. Please refer to page 5 of the Postgraduate Guide to Assessment for further information: http://www.reading.ac.uk/internal/exams/student/exa-guidePG.aspx

Length of examination:

Requirements for a pass:
A mark of 50% overall.

Reassessment arrangements:
An essay of 2,000, on a topic selected from a list of four.

Additional Costs (specified where applicable):
1) Required text books:
2) Specialist equipment or materials:
3) Specialist clothing, footwear or headgear:
4) Printing and binding:
5) Computers and devices with a particular specification:
6) Travel, accommodation and subsistence:

Last updated: 31 March 2017

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