CLMANB-Ancient Navigation and Maritime Archaeology B

Module Provider: Classics
Number of credits: 30 [15 ECTS credits]
Level:7
Terms in which taught: Spring / Summer term module
Pre-requisites:
Non-modular pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Modules excluded:
Module version for: 2016/7

Module Convenor: Prof Annalisa Marzano

Email: A.Marzano@reading.ac.uk

Summary module description:
This module is taught both in Venice, at Ca' Foscari University (a three week stay) and in Reading during the Spring and Summer terms. The module aims to develop the students' research skills in the study of maritime trade in antiquity and the Middle Ages, by focussing on the archaeological data pertaining Mediterranean maritime trade and the study of archaeological methods connected to navigation. Teaching in Venice comprises of field trips to relevant museums and archaeological sites.

Aims:
This module is taught both in Venice, at Ca' Foscari University (a three week stay) and in Reading during the Spring and Summer terms. The module aims to develop the students' research skills in the study of maritime trade in antiquity and the Middle Ages, by focussing on the archaeological data pertaining Mediterranean maritime trade and the study of archaeological methods connected to navigation. Teaching in Venice comprises of field trips to relevant museums and archaeological sites.

Assessable learning outcomes:
On completion of this module, students should be able:
• to place the study of maritime trade within the larger context of methods and approaches used in economic history and maritime archaeology;
• to analyse selected ancient port-towns of the Mediterranean in terms of their structural history, their place in the development of trade networks, their social, economic or religious function, and their subsequent use and influence;
• to recognise and interpret aspects of the physical remains of selected monuments in the field (e.g. shipwrecks);
• to locate, extract and assemble data and information from varied sources with minimal guidance;
• to organise wide-ranging material and to articulate complex arguments effectively in writing in assessed essays, and orally in seminar discussions and site presentations.

Additional outcomes:
The module also promotes the development of high-level problem-solving skills applied to diverse, complex and incomplete data. Seminar discussion and written work encourage independent learning and the exercise of initiative. Students will also practice modern language skills through reading foreign language publications and through social interactions during the Venice stay.

Outline content:
The content of the intensive Venice course (three weeks long taking place in April) includes seminars and guided reading on the following topics: evolution of shipbuilding; harbours, shipyards and shipsheds; life onboard and nautical equipment of antiquity; commerce of marble in the Roman period; commercial dynamics in the Roman world; Medieval harbours; Maritime trade in the Middle Ages. The site visits will feature: Museum and excavations of Altino; ancient Aquileia, harbour and museum; Venice’s Arsenali Navali.
During spring term the students will work at Reading guided by the Programme Director investigating several topics related to trade and commodities in the Roman period. Guided independent study will also focus on the research for the dissertation and, depending on students’ chosen topics and interests, some of the seminar will also look at material related to the dissertation topic.

Brief description of teaching and learning methods:
Guided site visits, requiring student preparation in advance, lectures and seminars. Students have a major topic for study agreed with the home institution, on which they present a seminar and submit a written essay.

Contact hours:
  Autumn Spring Summer
Lectures 15
Seminars 10 5
Fieldwork 10
Guided independent study 140 120
       
Total hours by term 150.00 150.00
       
Total hours for module 300.00

Summative Assessment Methods:
Method Percentage
Written assignment including essay 80
Oral assessment and presentation 20

Other information on summative assessment:

Formative assessment methods:
One oral presentation to be given in Reading after the end of the Venice course, on one of the sites visited while in Venice. The topic of the presentation is to be agreed with the programme director at Reading (20%); one major essay of 4-5,000 words (80%).
Relative percentage of coursework: 100%

Penalties for late submission:
Penalties for late submission on this module are in accordance with the University policy. Please refer to page 5 of the Postgraduate Guide to Assessment for further information: http://www.reading.ac.uk/internal/exams/student/exa-guidePG.aspx

Length of examination:
N/A

Requirements for a pass:
50%

Reassessment arrangements:
Resubmission of written coursework in the following September.

Additional Costs (specified where applicable):
1) Required text books:
2) Specialist equipment or materials:
3) Specialist clothing, footwear or headgear:
4) Printing and binding:
5) Computers and devices with a particular specification:
6) Travel, accommodation and subsistence:

Last updated: 21 December 2016

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