CL2CMR-Classical Mythology in the Renaissance

Module Provider: Classics
Number of credits: 10 [5 ECTS credits]
Level:5
Terms in which taught: Autumn term module
Pre-requisites:
Non-modular pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Modules excluded:
Module version for: 2016/7

Module Convenor: Dr Luke Houghton

Email: l.houghton@reading.ac.uk

Summary module description:
This module provides an introduction to the uses made of classical mythology in Renaissance art, literature and material culture, with particular emphasis on Renaissance Italy. In addition to examining the appropriation of mythological subjects in civic and domestic settings, the module will consider different representations of particular individuals from classical mythology, such as the hero Hercules and the goddess Venus.

Aims:
This module aims to:

• introduce students to a range of uses of classical mythology in Renaissance art, literature and material culture.

• relate these uses of classical mythology to their contemporary contexts in (primarily Italian) Renaissance culture.

• explore differing attitudes towards pagan mythology suggested by texts and artefacts of the Renaissance, with reference (where appropriate) to comparative material from other historical periods.

Assessable learning outcomes:
By the end of the module it is expected that students will be able to:

• identify uses of mythological material from classical antiquity in a range of Renaissance art and literature, and point to possible literary and/or artistic sources for this material.

• analyse in a detailed and informed manner specific instances of the reception of classical mythology in art, literature and material culture from c.1300 to c.1600.

• locate uses of classical mythology in Renaissance culture within their contemporary artistic, literary, social, political, religious, philosophical and intellectual contexts, and suggest ways in which the character of these engagements with antiquity may have been affected by these contexts.

• give a critical account of the concept of a ‘Renaissance’ in European culture in historiography and other texts from the fourteenth century to the present day, and evaluate the continuing usefulness (or otherwise) of this conceptual framework.

Additional outcomes:
• Independent research and analysis

• Teamwork and presentation skills

Outline content:
This module examines the ways in which material from classical mythology was appropriated in public and domestic contexts during the period of the Renaissance. Following an introductory session on the concept of the Renaissance in historical thought, the module considers different approaches to the interpretation of ancient myth current during the Renaissance, such as allegory and euhemerism, and traces the ways in which these ideas affected the representation of classical gods, goddesses, heroes and monsters in Renaissance art and literature.

Brief description of teaching and learning methods:
Lectures, seminars and gallery visit.

Contact hours:
  Autumn Spring Summer
Lectures 4
Seminars 6
External visits 1
Guided independent study 89
       
Total hours by term 100.00
       
Total hours for module 100.00

Summative Assessment Methods:
Method Percentage
Written assignment including essay 100

Other information on summative assessment:
The module will be assessed by one essay of about 2500 words, to be submitted by 12 noon on Friday week 11 of Autumn term.

Formative assessment methods:
Class presentations.

Penalties for late submission:

The Module Convenor will apply the following penalties for work submitted late, in accordance with the University policy.
• where the piece of work is submitted up to one calendar week after the original deadline (or any formally agreed extension to the deadline): 10% of the total marks available for the piece of work will be deducted from the mark for each working day (or part thereof) following the deadline up to a total of five working days;
• where the piece of work is submitted more than five working days after the original deadline (or any formally agreed extension to the deadline): a mark of zero will be recorded.
The University policy statement on penalties for late submission can be found at:http://www.reading.ac.uk/web/FILES/qualitysupport/penaltiesforlatesubmission.pdf
You are strongly advised to ensure that coursework is submitted by the relevant deadline. You should note that it is advisable to submit work in an unfinished state rather than to fail to submit any work.

The Module Convenor will apply the following penalties for work submitted late, in accordance with the University policy.
  • where the piece of work is submitted up to one calendar week after the original deadline (or any formally agreed extension to the deadline): 10% of the total marks available for the piece of work will be deducted from the mark for each working day (or part thereof) following the deadline up to a total of five working days;
  • where the piece of work is submitted more than five working days after the original deadline (or any formally agreed extension to the deadline): a mark of zero will be recorded.

  • The University policy statement on penalties for late submission can be found at: http://www.reading.ac.uk/web/FILES/qualitysupport/penaltiesforlatesubmission.pdf
    You are strongly advised to ensure that coursework is submitted by the relevant deadline. You should note that it is advisable to submit work in an unfinished state rather than to fail to submit any work.

    Length of examination:
    n/a

    Requirements for a pass:
    40%

    Reassessment arrangements:
    Resubmission of coursework in August.

    Additional Costs (specified where applicable):
    1) Required text books:
    2) Specialist equipment or materials:
    3) Specialist clothing, footwear or headgear:
    4) Printing and binding:
    5) Computers and devices with a particular specification:
    6) Travel, accommodation and subsistence:

    Last updated: 21 December 2016

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