AR3R12-Objects and Identities in the Roman Empire

Module Provider: Archaeology
Number of credits: 20 [10 ECTS credits]
Level:6
Terms in which taught: Autumn term module
Pre-requisites: AR1TS3 Practising Archaeology: methods and approaches
Non-modular pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Modules excluded:
Module version for: 2017/8

Module Convenor: Dr Hella Eckardt

Email: h.eckardt@reading.ac.uk

Summary module description:
The module will examine the relationship between the consumption of objects and the expression of identities. Students will become familiar with theoretical approaches to material culture and the practical analysis of Roman objects from across the Empire.

Aims:
This module covers the archaeological interpretation of Roman material culture and aims to familiarise students with the practical and theoretical aspects of artefact analysis. The course will concentrate on the relationship between the consumption of objects and the expression of social and cultural identities.

Suggested preparatory reading: Deetz, J. 1996 In Small Things Forgotten: an Archaeology of Early American Life, New York: Anchor Books.

Assessable learning outcomes:
By the end of the module it is expected that the student will be able:

  • to recognise and critically appraise past and current theoretical approaches to the subject
  • to produce written descriptions and evaluations of specific examples suitable for a catalogue
  • to articulate an understanding of the interpretative potential of these artefacts
  • to research (including bibliographic research), select and present relevant information from archaeological evidence and secondary readings in the form of a well-formulated and structured argument
  • to organise material and to articulate arguments effectively in writing and in seminar presentations.

Additional outcomes:
The module also aims to encourage students to build on both the theoretical and the practical awareness gained in Year 2. Practical and visual skills will be developed through workshops (e.g. on Roman glass, on developing a typology and on researching a mystery object) and a museum visit. Presentational skills will be enhanced through seminar-based discussions and reporting of individual study projects. Use of online materials will develop IT skills. The module will encourage the development of team-working and problem-solving skills and provide opportunities for self-directed study.

Outline content:

Brief description of teaching and learning methods:
Weekly illustrated lectures, workshops and small group seminars requiring preparatory reading and research. Students will present a seminar paper based on the set readings and write a brief catalogue entry for an archaeological object. Students are also required to make a more detailed study of a group of artefacts.

Contact hours:
  Autumn Spring Summer
Lectures 20
Practicals classes and workshops 8
External visits 2
Guided independent study 170
       
Total hours by term 200.00
       
Total hours for module 200.00

Summative Assessment Methods:
Method Percentage
Written assignment including essay 60
Oral assessment and presentation 10
Set exercise 30

Other information on summative assessment:
Students will present a seminar paper based on the set readings and write a brief catalogue entry for an archaeological object. Students are also required to make a more detailed study of a group of artefacts - this essay topic can be chosen independently in consultation with the tutor.

Formative assessment methods:

Penalties for late submission:
The Module Convenor will apply the following penalties for work submitted late, in accordance with the University policy.

  • where the piece of work is submitted up to one calendar week after the original deadline (or any formally agreed extension to the deadline): 10% of the total marks available for the piece of work will be deducted from the mark for each working day (or part thereof) following the deadline up to a total of five working days;
  • where the piece of work is submitted more than five working days after the original deadline (or any formally agreed extension to the deadline): a mark of zero will be recorded.

  • The University policy statement on penalties for late submission can be found at: http://www.reading.ac.uk/web/FILES/qualitysupport/penaltiesforlatesubmission.pdf
    You are strongly advised to ensure that coursework is submitted by the relevant deadline. You should note that it is advisable to submit work in an unfinished state rather than to fail to submit any work.

    Length of examination:

    Requirements for a pass:
    A mark of 40% overall.

    Reassessment arrangements:
    Re-submission of coursework in August/September

    Additional Costs (specified where applicable):
    1) Required text books:
    2) Specialist equipment or materials:
    3) Specialist clothing, footwear or headgear:
    4) Printing and binding:
    5) Computers and devices with a particular specification:
    6) Travel, accommodation and subsistence:

    Last updated: 7 August 2017

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