AR2R9-Celts and Romans: Northern Europe and Britain

Module Provider: Archaeology
Number of credits: 20 [10 ECTS credits]
Level:5
Terms in which taught: Spring / Summer term module
Pre-requisites:
Non-modular pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Modules excluded:
Module version for: 2017/8

Module Convenor: Dr John Creighton

Email: j.d.creighton@reading.ac.uk

Summary module description:
The module provides students with an understanding of the particular character of the archaeological evidence for the Roman presence in Northern Europe in the period 300 BC to AD 300, and its relation to the documentary evidence, in the context of the major social, cultural and economic changes of the region in this period.

Aims:
The module aims to provide students with an understanding of the particular character of the archaeological evidence for the Roman presence in Northern Europe in the period 300 BC to AD 300, and its relation to the documentary evidence, in the context of the major social, cultural and economic changes of the region in this period. It particularly focuses upon Britain.

Assessable learning outcomes:
By the end of the module it is expected that the student will be able:

• to recognise and to evaluate the main types of archaeological and documentary evidence for the period;
• to identify social, cultural and economic developments in Northern Europe during this period;
• to recognise current theoretical approaches to, and interpretations of, the period;
• to organise material and to articulate arguments effectively in writing, both under timed conditions and in assessed essays.

Additional outcomes:
The module also aims to encourage the development of oral communication skills and students' effectiveness in different group situations.

Outline content:
This unit looks at the interaction between the Iron Age communities of Northern Europe and that of Rome from 300 BC to c. AD 300, at first through diplomacy and trade, and then through conquest. The main emphasis is on exploring the resulting two-way processes of acculturation which led to the creation of a Romano-British and Gallo-Roman culture, and in particular on identifying what traits of the Later Iron Age continued well into the Roman period. Specific themes addressed are: problems surrounding identity and the use of the words 'Celt' and ‘Roman’; development of oppida and Roman towns; continuity and change in ritual practices; evidence for changing patterns of social structure; the relative impact of military force on social change.

Global context:
This module explores cultural diversity in terms of both past ways of life and current academic traditions. Discussion of the terms 'Celt' and 'Roman' draw on both ancient and modern concepts of cultural identity. Students with French and German also have the opportunity to explore a wider body of relevant literature.

Brief description of teaching and learning methods:
Illustrated lectures are followed by structured group discussions and debates requiring preparatory reading and research. Students will write one assessed essay which will be returned in individual tutorials. There is a revision class in the Summer term.

This is a 20 credit module, which means that it is intended to occupy you for 200 hours of work: seminar preparation, background reading, essay reading, writing, revision and sitting the examination. With that in mind your self-directed study might be organised approximately as follows:
30 hours: Engaged in reading and note taking from ‘key texts’ for each week
30 hours: Engaged in reading, preparation and writing your essay
77 hours: Background reading for lectures (e.g. 7-8 hours per topic)
25 hours: Revision

Recommended Reading
R - Creighton, J. 2006. Britannia: the creation of a Roman province. Cambridge: CUP.
R - Mattingly, D. 2006. An imperial possession: Britain in the Roman Empire. London: Penguin Books
R - Millett, M. 1990. The Romanization of Britain. Cambridge: CUP.

Contact hours:
  Autumn Spring Summer
Lectures 10
Seminars 10
Tutorials 2
Guided independent study 150 28
       
Total hours by term 170.00 30.00
       
Total hours for module 200.00

Summative Assessment Methods:
Method Percentage
Written exam 40
Written assignment including essay 60

Other information on summative assessment:
Coursework: Students will write one essay of 3000 words, and participate regularly in seminar discussion. The essay counts towards their assessment. The essay will be submitted in the Spring Term, on dates set by the Department.

Formative assessment methods:

Penalties for late submission:
The Module Convenor will apply the following penalties for work submitted late, in accordance with the University policy.

  • where the piece of work is submitted up to one calendar week after the original deadline (or any formally agreed extension to the deadline): 10% of the total marks available for the piece of work will be deducted from the mark for each working day (or part thereof) following the deadline up to a total of five working days;
  • where the piece of work is submitted more than five working days after the original deadline (or any formally agreed extension to the deadline): a mark of zero will be recorded.

  • The University policy statement on penalties for late submission can be found at: http://www.reading.ac.uk/web/FILES/qualitysupport/penaltiesforlatesubmission.pdf
    You are strongly advised to ensure that coursework is submitted by the relevant deadline. You should note that it is advisable to submit work in an unfinished state rather than to fail to submit any work.

    Length of examination:
    One unseen two-hour paper requiring two answers, to be taken at the time of the Part 2 examinations.

    Requirements for a pass:
    A mark of 40% overall.

    Reassessment arrangements:
    Re-examination and/or resubmission of coursework will take place in August/September.

    Additional Costs (specified where applicable):
    1) Required text books:
    2) Specialist equipment or materials:
    3) Specialist clothing, footwear or headgear:
    4) Printing and binding:
    5) Computers and devices with a particular specification:
    6) Travel, accommodation and subsistence:

    Last updated: 31 March 2017

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