SP1I1-Icons of Spain and Latin America: From conquest to independence; from revolution to globalisation

Module Provider: Modern Languages
Number of credits: 20 [10 ECTS credits]
Level:4
Terms in which taught: Autumn / Spring term module
Pre-requisites:
Non-modular pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Modules excluded:
Current from: 2018/9

Module Convenor: Dr Catriona McAllister

Email: c.mcallister@reading.ac.uk

Type of module:

Summary module description:
This module introduces students of Spanish to the historical trajectory that forms the roots of modern-day Spain and Latin America, through the guided analysis of written and visual texts that span over five centuries. Through a series of lectures and seminars, in the Autumn term, students will learn about the factors that contributed to the development of both Spain and Latin America, from Columbus’s voyage in 1492 to the decline of the Spanish nation and its Empire, and the push for independence in Latin America that characterised the nineteenth century. In the Spring Term, students will learn about the factors that contributed to the more recent development of both Spain and Latin America, from the Mexican Revolution, the Spanish Civil War, immigration, and the growing presence of the US across the continent, to contemporary debates about globalisation.

Aims:
To provide students with an overview of the political and cultural history of Spain and Latin America from 1492 to the present; to enable them to describe socio-political development and to develop practice and confidence in reading and analysing related historical and cultural texts.

Assessable learning outcomes:
Students will have demonstrated their ability to:

- identify and discuss major events, factors and figures in this period of Spanish and Latin American history, and the complex relationship between the two regions
- analyse, evaluate and put into context a selection of Spanish and Latin American historical and cultural texts
- develop skills in textual analysis
- make appropriate use of secondary sources

Additional outcomes:
Students will be able to:
-develop their language skills by reading short Spanish and Latin American texts and watching films
-develop an understanding of different approaches to historical events
-develop skills in communication, information handling, constructing arguments and essay writing

Outline content:
Throughout the Autumn Term there will be two weekly sessions (combining lecture and seminar work) on iconic figures and themes reflecting the history and culture of Spain and Latin America from 1492 to 1898. These will typically include the construction of the New World by Christopher Columbus; socio-cultural change in Spain as a result of the burgeoning Empire; indigenous and pro-indigenous perspectives on Empire and colonisation; slave rebellions and the first stirrings of independence; the independence wars of the nineteenth century; the end of the Spanish Empire in 1898.

Throughout the Spring Term there will be two weekly sessions (combining lecture and seminar work) on iconic figures and themes reflecting the history and culture of Spain and Latin America from 1898 to the present day. These will typically include the end of the Spanish Empire in 1898; the Mexican Revolution; the crisis in Spain, the Spanish Civil War and the dictatorship; the Cuban Revolution of 1959; the growing US presence in the continent; immigration and Latino culture; the transition to democracy in Spain and the 'movida'; dictatorships in the Southern Cone; the impact of globalisation.

Brief description of teaching and learning methods:

The course will be taught through a combination of formal lectures (1 hour per week) and seminars (1 hour per week) in which students are expected to participate actively by undertaking small group work followed by group discussion. Assessments will be developed through formative work throughout the term. 


Contact hours:
  Autumn Spring Summer
Lectures 10 10
Seminars 10 10
Tutorials 2
Guided independent study 79 79
       
Total hours by term 99.00 99.00 2.00
       
Total hours for module 200.00

Summative Assessment Methods:
Method Percentage
Written exam 40
Written assignment including essay 30
Report 10
Oral assessment and presentation 20

Summative assessment- Examinations:
2 hours

Summative assessment- Coursework and in-class tests:

Essay: 1500 words. The essay will be conducted in two stages. Students will submit their essay in week 11 of Autumn Term for formative feedback. Students will then be required to redraft and improve their essays, taking into account the tutor feedback, and resubmit for summative assessment in week 5 of Spring Term.



Report (reflective report): 500 words, due week5 Spring Term. In this reflective report, students will explain how they have acted on the tutor feedback on the formative essay submitted in week 11 of Autumn Term.



Oral presentation: group presentation during Autumn or Spring Term



Written exam: 2 hours, Summer Term


Formative assessment methods:

As explained above, students will submit a formative essay in week 11 of Autumn Term and feedback will be provided. Students will then improve and resubmit the same essay for summative assessment in Spring Term. This formative assessment is compulsory as students need the tutor feedback in order to write their reflective commentary.



Additionally, some time will be taken during seminars to provide workshops on summative assessments and individual/group formative feedback will be provided on activities in class. Finally, there will be a revision session in advance of the exam.


Penalties for late submission:
The Module Convener will apply the following penalties for work submitted late:

  • where the piece of work is submitted after the original deadline (or any formally agreed extension to the deadline): 10% of the total marks available for that piece of work will be deducted from the mark for each working day[1] (or part thereof) following the deadline up to a total of five working days;
  • where the piece of work is submitted more than five working days after the original deadline (or any formally agreed extension to the deadline): a mark of zero will be recorded.

  • The University policy statement on penalties for late submission can be found at: http://www.reading.ac.uk/web/FILES/qualitysupport/penaltiesforlatesubmission.pdf
    You are strongly advised to ensure that coursework is submitted by the relevant deadline. You should note that it is advisable to submit work in an unfinished state rather than to fail to submit any work.

    Assessment requirements for a pass:
    40%

    Reassessment arrangements:

    Re- examination in August in the event of failure in this module and in Part 1. Coursework bearing a confirmed mark of 40% or more can be carried forward; all other coursework to be resubmitted by 12 NOON on the third Friday of August or, if the University is closed, by 12 NOON on the first working day thereafter.


    Additional Costs (specified where applicable):

    None


    Last updated: 20 April 2018

    THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS MODULE DESCRIPTION DOES NOT FORM ANY PART OF A STUDENT'S CONTRACT.

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