LS1ELU-The English Language in Use

Module Provider: English Language and Applied Linguistics
Number of credits: 20 [10 ECTS credits]
Level:4
Terms in which taught: Autumn / Spring / Summer module
Pre-requisites:
Non-modular pre-requisites:
Co-requisites: LS1ELS English Language and Society LS1SG Sounds, Grammar and Meaning
Modules excluded:
Module version for: 2016/7

Module Convenor: Dr Fraibet Aveledo

Email: f.aveledogonzalez@reading.ac.uk

Summary module description:
This module aims to provide students with an understanding of how English-using individuals acquire and use their language abilities, both in the context of the individual's biological capacities and in terms of the language user's context individually, in larger social groups and across communication types. It also aims to provide a general appreciation of the different modalities of spoken, signed and written human language.

Aims:
This module aims to provide students with an understanding of how English-speaking individuals acquire and use their language abilities, both in the context of the individual's biological capacities and in terms of the language user's context individually and in social and cultural groups.

Assessable learning outcomes:
Assessable outcomes
By the end of the module it is expected that the student will be able to:
-identify and explain the features that distinguish and relate individual and social/cultural aspects of English language use;
-locate and assemble information on individual and social/cultural aspects of English language behaviour;
-appraise the evidence for theories of language performance and use across a variety of context types
-organise their knowledge and articulate their arguments effectively in writing, in assessed essays.

Additional outcomes:
The module also aims to encourage the development of academic writing abilities and note-taking skills and to reinforce what is learned in large lecture groups by facilitating students' involvement in small group seminars that support the main lectures. Students will also develop their bibliographic and IT skills by use of indicated resources.

Outline content:
The content is organised around two main themes, the English language user as an individual, and as a member of larger social/cultural groups. An appreciation of these aspects of language behaviour is important for many applied areas of linguistic science such as child language acquisition, psycholinguistics, language pathology, sociolinguistics and language and culture.
The study of language in the individual begins by looking at the characteristics of communication systems, and introduces the proposed 'design features' for comparison of human language with different types of communication in animals and non-human primates Particular attention is given to documented evidence of sign language abilities in chimpanzees. We then consider three phases of language behaviour in the individual: pre-school child language development giving detailed attention to grammatical, lexical and syntactic development; second language development in adults; and finally language pathologies in adults which result of brain injury.
The complementary theme of language and culture explores the ways in which we use language as members of different social/cultural groups. Touching on a range of issues, we look at language in such varying settings as: family, education, workplace, migration, language death, language planning, in-group and secret languages, language and age and sexism.

Brief description of teaching and learning methods:
Lectures, seminars and guided independent study.

Contact hours:
  Autumn Spring Summer
Lectures 10 10 2
Seminars 4 4 2
Guided independent study 61 61 46
       
Total hours by term 75.00 75.00 50.00
       
Total hours for module 200.00

Summative Assessment Methods:
Method Percentage
Written exam 67
Written assignment including essay 33

Other information on summative assessment:

Formative assessment methods:

Penalties for late submission:
The Module Convenor will apply the following penalties for work submitted late, in accordance with the University policy.

  • where the piece of work is submitted up to one calendar week after the original deadline (or any formally agreed extension to the deadline): 10% of the total marks available for the piece of work will be deducted from the mark for each working day (or part thereof) following the deadline up to a total of five working days;
  • where the piece of work is submitted more than five working days after the original deadline (or any formally agreed extension to the deadline): a mark of zero will be recorded.

  • The University policy statement on penalties for late submission can be found at: http://www.reading.ac.uk/web/FILES/qualitysupport/penaltiesforlatesubmission.pdf
    You are strongly advised to ensure that coursework is submitted by the relevant deadline. You should note that it is advisable to submit work in an unfinished state rather than to fail to submit any work.

    Length of examination:
    One hour

    Requirements for a pass:
    A mark of 40% overall.

    Reassessment arrangements:
    Re-examination in August / September. Coursework will be carried forward if it bears a mark of 40% or more overall. Otherwise it must be re-submitted by 22nd August.

    Additional Costs (specified where applicable):
    1) Required text books:
    2) Specialist equipment or materials:
    3) Specialist clothing, footwear or headgear:
    4) Printing and binding:
    5) Computers and devices with a particular specification:
    6) Travel, accommodation and subsistence:

    Last updated: 21 December 2016

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