FTMFTF-Festivals and Programming

Module Provider: Film, Theatre and TV
Number of credits: 20 [10 ECTS credits]
Level:7
Terms in which taught: Spring term module
Pre-requisites:
Non-modular pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Modules excluded:
Current from: 2018/9

Module Convenor: Prof Lucia Nagib

Email: l.nagib@reading.ac.uk

Type of module:

Summary module description:

This is a team-taught module, drawing both on representatives from the industry and on strength across the university. Through a dynamic combination of seminars, workshops and group projects, as well as on-site training, the module will equip students with advanced knowledge of modes of programming public venues and organising festivals. An integrated 5-week strand combining film and theatre will branch out in subsequent weeks into specialist activities for film or theatre, according to the pathway chosen by the student. Provision for film students will focus on programming for arthouse, alternative and experimental venues, as well as on the modes of organising film festivals. Film festivals work as an effective (and sometimes unfair) filter of the kind of world cinema distributed to commercial and alternative venues around the world. Understanding how both film festivals and film programming work is hence key to understanding the kind of world cinema we watch. Provision for theatre students will focus on the ‘festivalisation’ of theatre events as a significant feature of the contemporary theatre and performance landscape, and we will examine issues and models of the funding, programming, organisation and dissemination of such festivals, as well as programming for commercial and independent venues. We will also address the ways in which festivals often combine theatre and the arts.


Aims:

The aims of this module are:

• To equip students advanced knowledge of programming arthouse, alternative and experimental venues, including on-site training at major film festivals (such as Berlin and Rotterdam);

• To equip students with in-depth knowledge of the workings of film festivals, be they major, minor, competitive, non-competitive, thematic, genre-oriented or experimental;

• To offer a critical insight into the filtering process promoted by the pool of world festivals;

• To offer a critical understanding of the consequences of the funding practices promoted by film festivals;

• Through practical projects, to equip students with fundamental skills for becoming film programmers;

• Through practical projects, to equip students with fundamental skills for becoming film-festival organisers.



•   To equip students advanced knowledge of programming a range of theatre / arts venues at local and national level;



•   To equip students with in-depth knowledge of advertising strategies and the funding mechanisms and structures particular to theatre / multi-arts festivals; ?



•   To offer a critical insight into the kinds of theatre / performance that tends to be included and promoted at major international theatre festivals such as the annual Theatertreffen in Berlin or the Dublin Theatre Festival;



•   Through practical projects, to equip students with fundamental skills for becoming theatre / festival programmers and / or organisers. ?


Assessable learning outcomes:

On completion of this module, students will:

• Have an in-depth understanding of the programming structure of specific film / theatre / multi-arts venues

• Have an in-depth knowledge of the workings of film festivals, be they major, minor, competitive, non-competitive, thematic, genre-oriented or experimental, and of theatre / performance / mulit-arts festivals;;

• Have a comprehensive understanding of the filtering process promoted by the pool of world festivals;

• Have a critical understanding of the consequences the funding practices promoted by film / theatre / arts festivals;

• Be able to develop practical projects in film / theatre / arts  programming;

• Be able to develop practical projects for film / theatre / multi-arts festivals.


Additional outcomes:


  • The module will serve as a useful complement to other modules taught in the MA Creative Enterprise;

  • It will provide students with critical view of the mainstream and alternative markets for film and theatre.

  • It will enable them to understand the degree of interdependence that can be ascribed to film / theatre / arts festivals and commercial/non-commercial film / theatre / arts venues;

  • It will provide them with the necessary skills for finding employment in the sector.


Outline content:

1) Seminar: the history and geography of film/theatre festivals;

2) Seminar: the history and international development of the commercial and alternative circuits for film and theatre;

3) Seminar: the logic and consequences of the festival filter;

4) Seminar: the question of independence in arthouse and alternative venues;

5) Seminar: the question of independence in film and theatre making;

6) Workshop: arthouse case study;

7) Workshop: major festival case study;

8) Workshop: experimental venue;

9) Group project: preparing a portfolio for a season for the Reading Film Theatre or South Street Arts Centre

10) Group project: proofing copyright and ethical issue.


Brief description of teaching and learning methods:

This is a team-taught module drawing from academic and industry-based expertise. There will be a combination of theoretical, historical and practical seminars and workshops addressing the main issues in the history, geography and development of film and theatre programming and festivals worldwide. Students will be active participants throughout, being the main drive in the conception and execution of the group project and written portfolio.


Contact hours:
  Autumn Spring Summer
Seminars 10
Project Supervision 4
Practicals classes and workshops 6
Guided independent study 180
       
Total hours by term 200.00
       
Total hours for module 200.00

Summative Assessment Methods:
Method Percentage
Written assignment including essay 40
Portfolio 60

Summative assessment- Examinations:

Summative assessment- Coursework and in-class tests:

Formative assessment methods:

Each student will give non-assessed presentations on their written case studies and practical projects.


Penalties for late submission:
Penalties for late submission on this module are in accordance with the University policy. Please refer to page 5 of the Postgraduate Guide to Assessment for further information: http://www.reading.ac.uk/internal/exams/student/exa-guidePG.aspx

Assessment requirements for a pass:

50%


Reassessment arrangements:

Re-submission of failed coursework by 1 September


Additional Costs (specified where applicable):

Last updated: 20 April 2018

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS MODULE DESCRIPTION DOES NOT FORM ANY PART OF A STUDENT'S CONTRACT.

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