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David Sutton – University of Reading

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David Sutton

Name:
Dr David Sutton
Job Title:
Research Director

Contact

Responsibilities

David is responsible for four research projects:

Awards

  • Benson Medal for outstanding services to literature, Royal Society of Literature, 2002
  • Archivist of the Year, Scone Foundation, New York, 2006

Other roles

  • Corresponding Member of the Sub-Committee on Education and Research (SCEaR), UNESCO Memory of the World Programme
  • Member of the committees of GLAM (the Group for Literary Archives and Manuscripts) and the UK Literary Heritage Working Group. Chair of GLAM, 2010-
  • Chair/Président of the Section for Archives of Literature and Art (SLA) of the International Council on Archives (ICA)
  • Contributing member of the MILE and ARROW working groups on “orphan works”
  • Associate Member of the University of Reading English Department
  • Coordinator of the Reading Fairtrade Town Committee
  • Leader of Reading Borough Council (1995-2008) and former vice-chair of the Local Government Information Unit
  • Member of the Board of Reading Buses. Chair of the Board, 2010- 
  • Trustee of the Earley Charity (1987- )
  • Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts; Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature; Member of the Society of Authors
  • Trustee of the Oxford Symposium on Food and Cookery

International Project Partners, 2014-2018

Areas of Interest

Literary manuscripts and literary research; international locations of primary literary materials; copyright and orphan works; international cooperation and fair trade; urban development and municipal government; food history.

Research groups / Centres

Publications

  • Sutton, D. 'Keeping WATCH: tracking down copyright holders'. Library and information update. 4 (12), December 2005, pp. 42-43.
  • Sutton, D. 'The copyright detectives'. The Bookseller. 9 July 1999, pp. 24-26.
  • Sutton, D. Locating UK copyright holders. Electronically published on the WATCH site
  • Sutton, D. The WATCH Project (PDF). SCONUL Newsletter 28, Spring 2003, p. 67.
  • Sutton, D. C. ‘Locating literary manuscripts’. Reading reading, Spring 1991, pp. 20-21.
  • Sutton, D.C. ‘Copyright issues in archives’. Paper given at the Annual Conference of the Greek Society of Archivists, Athens, February 2006; abstract at www.eae.org.gr/congress/Papers/papers.html
  • Sutton, D. C. 'Historia de las ales inglesas’. Paper given at Carmona, September 2007, “en el programa del curso Curso interdisciplinario: La cerveza y su mundo, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Sevilla”.
  • Sutton, D.C. ‘The language of the food of the poor: studying proverbs with Jean-Louis Flandrin’, in Food and language: proceedings of the Oxford Symposium on Food and Cookery 2009, edited by Richard Hosking. Totnes: Prospect Books, 2010, pp. 330-339.
  • Sutton, D. C.: ‘The stories of bacalao: myth, legend and history’, in Cured, fermented and smoked foods: proceedings of the Oxford Symposium on Food and Cookery 2010, by Helen Saberi. Totnes: Prospect Books, 2011, pp. 312-321.
  • Sutton, D.C.: Figs: a global history. London: Reaktion Books, 2014.
  • Sutton, David C.: ‘The destinies of literary manuscripts: past, present and future.’ Archives and manuscripts 42 (3), November 2014, pp. 295-300.
  • Sutton, David C.: ‘Nefs: ships of the table and the origins of etiquette’, in Material culture: proceedings of the Oxford Symposium on Food and Cookery 2013, edited by Mark McWilliams. Totnes: Prospect Books, 2014, pp. 304-313.
  • Sutton, David C.: ‘Markets under attack: rioters and regulators in Georgian England’, in Markets: proceedings of the Oxford Symposium on Food and Cookery 2014, edited by Mark McWilliams. Totnes: Prospect Books, 2015, pp. 388-398.
  • Sutton, David C.: ‘The Diasporic Literary Archives Network and the Commonwealth: Namibia, Nigeria, Trinidad & Tobago, and other examples.’ New review of information networking 21:1 (2016), pp. 37-51.

 

 

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