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The Ure Museum of Greek Archaeology

News and Events

 

Upcoming family events

 

Gordon Lecture 2014

Thursday 13th March 2014 from 4.30pm

The Ure Museum of Greek Archaeology is delighted to present the Second Annual Gordon Lecture.  Professor Mireille M. Lee, Professor of History of Art and Classical Studies at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee, will deliver a lecture on ‘Reflections on Ancient Greek Mirrors’. Her research and teaching focus on gender issues in antiquity and the modern world as well as ancient art & archaeology. Her current book project is on the relationship between ancient Greek mirrors and the goddess Aphrodite. Professor Lee has held fellowships from the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts, the American Council of Learned Societies, the Center for Hellenic Studies, the Packard Foundation for the Humanities, and the Whiting Foundation.

We have established this lecture in memory of Professor James Edward Gordon (1913–1998), a pioneering materials scientist and biomechanical engineer, who served as Professor of Materials Engineering at University of Reading. His long held interest in the ancient world led to interdisciplinary collaborations, especially with the late Dr John Landels, and their establishment of a joint degree in Classics and Engineering. While that degree is no longer available, Professor Gordon is well remembered on the campus, not least in the excellent Gordon Theatre, with a bequest of his Carthaginian artefacts to the Ure Museum and now with this annual lecture. In recognition of Professor Gordon’s interests in the ancient technology and materials the lecturer will consider, amongst other matters, some important aspects of the manufacture of ancient mirrors.

The event will commence with drinks from 4:30. The event is open to the public but places are limited. Therefore booking is required.  Please RSVP by no later than Friday 28th February to Guja Bandini at ure@reading.ac.uk  or 0118 378 6990. Please advise us of any special mobility or dietary requirements you may have.

 

Volunteers' Open day 2013:

Come to the Ure Museum on Wednesday 9th October from 2.00 to 4.00pm to find out more about our volunteering opportunities.

Check http://www.reading.ac.uk/Ure/info/Volunteers/Volunteers.php for information.

Summer Vacation 2013 opening hours:

Throughout the University's summer vacation, from Monday 1st July to Friday 4th October, the Ure Museum will be opened only 3 days a week, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, 9.00 am to 4:30 pm.

The Museum will resume the normal Term Opening Hours on Monday 7th October 2013.

 

Heritage Open Days 2013

Bringing Ancient inscriptions to Reading. Friday 13th September 2013

How did antiquities come to our town and become part of our heritage? What if they couldn’t be moved? How were we still able to make them ours?

We will explore this interesting theme in a 2-part evening event especially organized for this year’s Heritage Open Days.

 

Visitors will learn about and experience first-hand how scholars are able to ‘take inscriptions’ with them for study without actually moving them from their original locations. Each workshop participant will have the chance to take a “squeeze” of an inscription.

 

  • Lecture: “Libya … Virginia Water … Reading: the mysterious journey of a Roman tombstone.” 6.00pm-6.30pm.

Prof. Amy Smith, Curator of the Ure Museum and senior lecturer in the department of Classics of the University of Reading, will take us on the marvellous journey of the tombstone of a Roman woman whose memorial remains in Reading.

 

 

Booking is required for the workshop, since there is a maximum number of 30 people for the session.

No booking is required for attending the lecture and visitors can decide to attend one or both parts of the event.

The workshop is suitable for children aged 6+ and for adults. Adults are welcome with or without their children but unfortunately all children will have to bring their adults!

As the lecture part of the event is more suitable for adults, craft activities will be offered for children during the lecture.

After the lecture, from 6.30pm to 7.00pm, drinks and nibbles will be served in the department of Classics.

 

 

Ure discovery exhibition

From Monday 17th June to Friday 30th August 2013

The Ure Museum’s collection of Greek artefacts shines with new light through the eyes and interpretation of Reading’s Youth. Visit our special summer exhibition and use the virtual trail developed in collaboration with the pupils of 3 local schools to discover a new way to experience art and history. Free entry. No booking required.

 

Pupils at Reading schools, working with University of Reading students, had the chance to reinterpret the collection housed in the Ure Museum of Greek Archaeology, through digital animations and creative art works, bringing ancient art and myths to life. 

After learning about ancient Greek vase decoration and hearing the stories of Greek myths, the pupils selected the vases which most inspired them from all the cases of the Ure Museum. They thought about the characters depicted on the vases, of the scenes in which they participated, of what the characters were doing and therefore what myth might be represented.

The next step was to work in groups to imagine what the characters would do next if they could move.  Out of the static scenes, each group of pupils developed first a storyline and then storyboards to communicate to the animator how the scene should develop. 

A storyboard breaks the story down into a series of key frames; images, captions and notes clarify what’s going on and what’s important.  The animator then recreated these frames in a digital format and added movement between the frames.

The final step of the pupils’ reinterpretation of the collection was to express creatively their own personal take on Greek art and mythology. They chose different techniques and materials to produce a diverse and stunning series of art works: drawings, paintings, figurines and vases.

 

The work of the pupils of three Reading Schools has been collected to create this multimedia exhibition.

Animations, created by the digital artist Steve Simons from the storyboards sketched by the pupils, bring ancient pots to life in the iPad’s virtual tour produced during the project.

The visitor’s virtual experience of the Ure Museum’s collection, following the theme of Greek myth, is enriched by the digital access to the images of the pupils’ creative interpretation of the objects and of the stories.

The voice-over narration (accompanied by a written version) increases accessibility to the collection, while offering additional information to the visitor.

Alongside this digital element, the exhibition also offers a display of the original artworks produced by the pupils and of some of the Ancient Greek pots which inspired them.

In three boards each of the schools tells the visitor the story of their journey discovering the Ure Museum’s collection through the Ure Discovery Project, using photos, drawings and words.

These different elements together create a lively, diverse and interactive display, which involves the visitor in the process of discovery as well as the final product.

 

Throughout the summer you will also be able to use the digital trail to guide you around the Ure Museum. Just ask the staff for an iPad.

 

 

 

University Committee for the Arts Bursary

Thanks to a bursary from the University Committee for the Arts, the Ure Museum (Classics Department) seeks to employ, for a 15-day period over the summer, a student with an interest in classical and/or historical subjects, with interest/skills in oral history, archives, and/or online resources, to organise and make accessable the Ure Museum’s ‘oral history’. This small cluster of ‘oral history’ of the Ure Museum, a multimedia archive assembled between 2006-2009 has now handed over to the Ure Museum and is waiting to be incorporated into the Ure archives and made available to a wider audience. This is an excellent opportunity for a multitasking student to demonstrate initiative, ability to work with a team but also to work independently and to complete a task. S/he will gain experience with analog and digital archival methods, think creatively, and potentially write and publish a pamphlet in his/her own name.

Applications consisting of a letter of interest, an updated cv and names of 2 referees should be sent to Dr. AmyUniversity Committee for Arts Bursay Smith, Curator of the Ure Museum, at a.c.smith@reading.ac.uk, before 13 June. The successful candidate will be awarded 750 bursary for 15 days of work, irrespective of whether this work is accomplished on a full- or part-time basis. In your letter please do indicate your availability including preferred hours/days. Questions about this opportunity should be addressed to Dr. Amy Smith, Curator of the Ure Museum, at a.c.smith@reading.ac.uk

 

Gift of the Nile: ancient Greeks & Egyptians

Study Day

Saturday 18th May 2013 - 10.00am to 3.00pm

Join the researchers at the Department of Classics and the Ure Museum to investigate the interaction of Ancient Greeks & Egyptians Through trade, politics, art and literature.

    Professor Phiroze Vasunia: Black Athena

    Dr Amy Smith: Dressing like a Greek for Egyptian gods

    Professor Ian Rutherford: Mummified cats in Egypt

    Marianne Bergeron (British Museum): Naukratis: new research on the Greeks in Egypt

    Dr  Nick West: ‘It’s all Greek to me’: making sense of hieroglyphics

    Dr Gill Knight: News from Egypt (on papyrus letters)

 

For full programme of the day please follow the link Study Day 2013 Programme.

The day is free of charge but registration is required.

There will be a break for lunch and a chance to enjoy the Ure Museum’s impressive collections.

To book your place, please contact  the Ure Museum: ure@reading.ac.uk / 0118 378 6990

 

Ure Museum studentship

Applications now open

 

 
The University of Reading's Classics Department is delighted to offer a funded full-time PhD studentship for an excellently qualified candidate to pursue a PhD in any field of Greek studies (archaeology, history, literature, language, philosophy, etc.).

The studentship covers the tuition fees for a three-year full-time PhD up to the rate for Home/EU students. As an element of career development, the successful candidate will be expected to work in a curatorial capacity in the Ure Museum for an average of two days per week. Some paid sessional teaching will also potentially be available in the department from year two of the programme.

For more information and to apply please follow the link Ure Museum Studentship

 

 

Spring Vacation 2013 opening hours:

The Ure Museum will remain closed from Thursday 28 March 2012 to Tuesday 2 April 2013.

Throughout the University's Spring Vacation, from Monday 25 March to Friday 19 April 2013, the Museum will be opened only 3 days a week, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, 9.00 am to 4:30 pm.

The Museum will resume the normal Term Opening Hours on Monday 22 April 2013.

 

The Gordon Lecture

Thursday 21st February 2013 - from 4.30pm

It is with great pleasure that we invite you to a very special lecture and celebration at the Ure Museum of Greek Archaeology, on Thursday 21st February 2013, beginning 4:30 pm.

We have established this lecture in celebration of the generous bequest to the Ure Museum of a collection of 75 Carthaginian artefacts and a Roman lamp, in memory of Prof. J.E.Gordon (1913-1998), a pioneering materials scientist and biomechanical engineer, Professor of Materials Engineering at University of reading.

We are delighted to present Prof. Peter Kruschwitz, Head of the Department of Classics, who will deliver a brief lecture on 'A Reading Lamp'  

" The Ure Museum owns a number of clay lamps, of various time periods and places of origin. At first glance, there seems to be nothing special about them: they are just everyday objects, produced en masse, to provide light during the dark hours, cheap and readily available: a wick, inserted through the nozzle, draws the oil that was contained in the body of the lamp, and can thus be ignited. Is there any point in rubbing one of those lamps, then, figuratively speaking, and in examining it closer? The short presentation will demonstrate how even a seemingly insignificant everyday object can yield a host of fascinating insights into the ancient world, the needs,
desires, and concerns of its people.”

For more information please follow the link Gordon_lecture_Ure.pdf

 

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Ure-Discovery, a "World Stories South East" project

The Ure Museum is delighted to announce that we have been awarded funding by the Arts Council England to develop a new project as part of the World Stories South East Stage 2.

This project develops from Ure View in 2011-12, in which University of Reading students helped pupils from some local schools to develop animations that exhibited their perspective on ancient life and their interpretation of some vases in the Ure Museum. This collaborative project was highlighted as part of the Cultural Olympiad, performed in Arts in Parliament on 24th July 2012 (see http://rpmcollections.wordpress.com/2012/05/24/ure-view-bringing-ancient-greece-to-life/).

Ure Discovery, evolving form the Ure View, will recruit a panel of University students who will once again work with the pupils of local schools to create an innovative exhibition voicing their own interpretations of the collection. The young people will be encouraged to use portable modern technology to create a virtual tour of the Museum, in which technology enhances and sustains the visitor's experience of the collection. Under the supervision of the student panel, the team of school pupils will use digital images and sounds to bring ancient art to life and the use of tablets will allow a much more flexible, accessible and personalised approach to the final result.

Thanks to our collaboration with iMuse (a project of AACT, a small, Reading-based, volunteer-run charity interested in accessibility communications technology) a special needs school from Reading will also collaborate in the project (see http://www.aact.org.uk/imusehome.php). Thanks to this addition to the team, Ure Discovery will be able to exploit the portable technology to improve accessibility to the Museum for special needs children and adults.

 

3D Museum

The Ure Museum is delighted to announce its purchase of a 3D projector, thanks to a generous grant from the University Friends. This projector will enable us to incorporate our growing number of 3D scans into the teaching, learning and outreach activities of the Museum, as well as conferences and lectures that deliver impact from our research. We will continue to work closely with Systems Engineering to optimise its usage, and look forward to announcing further developments in our 3D suite in the near future.

 

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Events

 

The Gordon Lecture

Thursday 21st February 2013 - from 4.30pm

It is with great pleasure that we invite you to a very special lecture and celebration at the Ure Museum of Greek Archaeology, on Thursday 21st February 2013, beginning 4:30 pm.

We have established this lecture in celebration of the generous bequest to the Ure Museum of a collection of 75 Carthaginian artefacts and a Roman lamp, in memory of Prof. J.E.Gordon (1913-1998), a pioneering materials scientist and biomechanical engineer, Professor of Materials Engineering at University of reading.

We are delighted to present Prof. Peter Kruschwitz, Head of the Department of Classics, who will deliver a brief lecture on 'A Reading Lamp'  

" The Ure Museum owns a number of clay lamps, of various time periods and places of origin. At first glance, there seems to be nothing special about them: they are just everyday objects, produced en masse, to provide light during the dark hours, cheap and readily available: a wick, inserted through the nozzle, draws the oil that was contained in the body of the lamp, and can thus be ignited. Is there any point in rubbing one of those lamps, then, figuratively speaking, and in examining it closer? The short presentation will demonstrate how even a seemingly insignificant everyday object can yield a host of fascinating insights into the ancient world, the needs,
desires, and concerns of its people.”

For more information please follow the link Gordon_lecture_Ure.pdf

 

Classics Research Seminars at the Ure Museum of Greek Archaeology

Tuesday 16th October 2012 - from 4.00pm

Dimitris Palaeothodoros, Assistant Professor of Classical Archaeology at the University of Thessaly (Greece), will talk about  "Boeotian Vases Abroad".

"A small number of boeotian vases, both black- and red-figured, have travelled abroad, either in adjacent areas (Euboea, Attica) or to more remote places (the Black Sea, Macedonia, the Aegean Islands, Thessaly and Italy). Scholars in the past assumed that these vases do not bear evidence on trade relations, but rather point to movement of individuals. In this lecture it is argued that this attitude stems from the common opinion that boeotian vases are unworthy of rousing commercial interest by foreign clients, because of their lower artistic and technical quality. I will try to locate these vases and their iconography within their specific archaeological context, whether possible, and discuss their place within the history of the development of boeotian vase-painting."

 

Visit the Ancient Games Right Here in Reading! 

Available until 6 September 2012

This summer the Ure Museum, in collaboration with iMuse, is ready to offer to its visitors a new experience of the collection.

Try out our new iPad trail: explore the museum following the tracks of the ancient Olympic games and find out how the latest digital technology can make your visit more interesting, more interactive and ... more FUN!

 

Ure-View Stories of the World exhibition

7th May 2012 - 30th August 2012

Explore the collision of the ancient and modern worlds at our special exhibition and art installation created by University students and local secondary schools. Part of Brighton Museum’s World Stories: Young Voices.

Further details will be provided next year.

 

Ure-View: Animating ancient Greece

Saturday 5th May, 2pm-5pm, drop in

Get animated by ancient Greece with our new digital animations and exhibition. We've put a modern spin on ancient Greece by making some giant pots and will be using them to display our unique animations. There will be lots of things for you to do and see including the chance to decorate your own pots, find out more about animation and play some ancient games!

Activities from 2pm-5pm - talk about how we did it starts at 2.30pm

 

Celebrate like it’s 776 BCE: the ancient Greek Olympics and Other Festivals

Classics Study day - Saturday 28 April 2012 10.00am to 4.00pm

Join researchers at the Department of Classics and the Ure Museum, University of Reading, for an enlightening and entertaining day of talks on an Olympic theme.

The day is free of charge but registration is required. There will be a break for lunch and a chance to enjoy the Ure Museum’s impressive collections.

To book your place, please contact Barbara Goff b.e.goff@reading.ac.uk

 

Other forthcoming family events at the Ure Museum.


Press Section

The press section includes all our latest news and press releases, as well as general information about the Ure Museum

Information regarding the launch of Brill's Companion to Aphrodite edited by Dr Amy Smith, Curator of the Ure Museum and Sadie Pickup can be found at the following link: -- http://www.reading.ac.uk/about/newsandevents/releases/PR276084.aspx

Other news

Entrance to MuseumThe Ure Museum launched its renewed learning environment on 26 October 2005. This event marked the completion of a year-long refurbishment of its displays, and was celebrated with a colloquium entitled 'The Ure Museum: a Retrospective'. The event was introduced by Prof. Emertus Jane Gardner, who spoke particularly about Annie Ure's role as Curator of the Museum during its first 54 years. The invited speakers were Dr. Victoria Sabetai (Academy of Athens) who spoke on 'R.M. Burrows and P.N. Ure in Boeotia' and Prof. Brian Sparkes (University of Southampton) who spoke on 'Troilos in Tuscany.'

Images of the launch are available at http://www.rdg.ac.uk/ ure/launch_pix/

The museum now presents its collections in an innovative and exciting way, and it will be a vibrant educational resource for visitors of all ages, as well as academics, students and the many school groups who come to learn about topics such as mummification, hieroglyphics and making Greek pottery.

One special new object now on display is a statue of Aphrodite and Eros on loan from the British Museum. A number of other new acquisitions and features will get their own mini-launches over the coming months.

The renewal project has been funded by the Arts & Humanities Research Council and the University with extra help from the Annual Fund and the Friends of the University. University of Reading departments as diverse as Typography, Physics and Soil Sciences lent a hand in transforming the Museum.

University of Reading
The Ure Museum, The University of Reading, Whiteknights, PO Box 217, Reading, RG6 6AH
File last modified: 30 Nov 2011