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information for prospective students


 
WHY STUDY SOCIOLOGY AT READING
 
Welcome to Reading, pilgrim of the modern age, wherever you are coming from, down the road in Pepper Lane or thousands of miles at the other end of the earth. If you come from faraway lands, you may want to familiarise yourself with our strange land. We have prepared for you some pictures of the campus, of the town, of the countryside around Reading. And, of course, we also have pictures of ourselves - teachers, students, staff, researchers (click here if you want to see people).

If you are just browsing to see what's going on at Reading, we welcome you to do so. Click in and out of these pages. Check us out.

If you are browsing because you are deciding which university to attend, then, you definitely should click in and out of these pages. We have nothing to hide. We have a firm commitment to transparency and openness. You will find just about everything about ourselves on our web (if something you would like to see is missing, let us know by sending an email to the sociology webmaster - address found at the bottom of each page).

Remember one thing: higher education has become a business, and increasingly so, a globalised business, particularly for English-speaking countries - English being the modern-age lingua franca. US universities had an early start in this business. But Australian universities have become increasingly aggressive in the huge Asian market. UK universities, outside Oxbridge, have been slow in advertising their wares. Yet, they do have much to offer. Pound for pound (or dollar for dollar) the best British universities have nothing to envy to their competitors (domestic or international as they may be) in terms of pastoral care, accommodation, and, last but not least, education. But you be the judge. Browse, click, navigate, and ... compare. Then, make up your mind. For each university you check out, ask yourself the tough questions:

  • how expensive is the BA?
  • how good is accommodation?
  • how small are classes?
  • what kind of pastoral care is available to students?
  • does the curriculum provide marketable skills?

One thing we do not promise: an easy ride through university life, an easy degree. Our students are here to learn and learn they should (and that requires effort on students' part). But we do promise to try our best, pedagogically, to instil in our students the passion and enthusiasm for learning; then, even hard work will seem light and easy. And the best way to learn, we believe, is not to be passive spectators in the production of knowledge but to be directly involved in research, in those projects that end up as knowledge in sociology textbooks. We are working hard at finding ways of involving students directly in research. Furthermore, we do promise to teach our students a set of highly marketable skills.

Best of luck with your choice of university!

 

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Last Published 08 August 2003